Turbulence-Induced Anti-Stokes Flow and the Resulting Limitations of Large-Eddy Simulation

Turbulence-Induced Anti-Stokes Flow and the Resulting Limitations of Large-Eddy Simulation AbstractThis study shows that the presence of Stokes drift us in the turbulent upper ocean induces a near-surface Eulerian current that opposes the Stokes drift. This current is distinct from previously studied anti-Stokes currents because it does not rely on the presence of planetary rotation or mean lateral gradients. Instead, the anti-Stokes flow arises from an interaction between the Stokes drift and turbulence. The new anti-Stokes flow is antiparallel to us near the ocean surface, is parallel to us at depth, and integrates to zero over the depth of the boundary layer. The presence of Stokes drift in large-eddy simulations (LES) is shown to induce artificial energy production caused by a combination of the new anti-Stokes flow and LES numerics. As a result, care must be taken when designing and interpreting simulations of realistic wave forcing, particularly as rotation becomes weak and/or us becomes perpendicular to the surface wind stress. The mechanism of the artificial energy production is demonstrated for a generalized LES subgrid scheme. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Physical Oceanography American Meteorological Society

Turbulence-Induced Anti-Stokes Flow and the Resulting Limitations of Large-Eddy Simulation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/turbulence-induced-anti-stokes-flow-and-the-resulting-limitations-of-SQE8IesogD
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0485
D.O.I.
10.1175/JPO-D-17-0208.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis study shows that the presence of Stokes drift us in the turbulent upper ocean induces a near-surface Eulerian current that opposes the Stokes drift. This current is distinct from previously studied anti-Stokes currents because it does not rely on the presence of planetary rotation or mean lateral gradients. Instead, the anti-Stokes flow arises from an interaction between the Stokes drift and turbulence. The new anti-Stokes flow is antiparallel to us near the ocean surface, is parallel to us at depth, and integrates to zero over the depth of the boundary layer. The presence of Stokes drift in large-eddy simulations (LES) is shown to induce artificial energy production caused by a combination of the new anti-Stokes flow and LES numerics. As a result, care must be taken when designing and interpreting simulations of realistic wave forcing, particularly as rotation becomes weak and/or us becomes perpendicular to the surface wind stress. The mechanism of the artificial energy production is demonstrated for a generalized LES subgrid scheme.

Journal

Journal of Physical OceanographyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 4, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off