Towards Quantifying the Climate Heat Engine: Solar Absorption and Terrestrial Emission Temperatures and Material Entropy Production

Towards Quantifying the Climate Heat Engine: Solar Absorption and Terrestrial Emission... AbstractA heat engine analysis of a climate system requires the determination of the solar absorption temperature and the terrestrial emission temperature. These temperatures are entropically defined as the ratio of the energy exchanged to the entropy produced. The emission temperature, shown here to be greater than or equal to the effective emission temperature, is relatively well known. In contrast, the absorption temperature requires radiative transfer calculations for its determination and is poorly known.The maximum material (i.e., nonradiative) entropy production of a planet’s steady-state climate system is a function of the absorption and emission temperatures. Because a climate system does no work, the material entropy production measures the system’s activity. The sensitivity of this production to changes in the emission and absorption temperatures is quantified. If Earth’s albedo does not change, material entropy production would increase by about five percent per one-degree increase in absorption temperature. If the absorption temperature does not change, entropy production would decrease by about four percent for a one percent decrease in albedo. We show that, as a planet’s emission temperature becomes more uniform, its entropy production tends to increase. Conversely, as a planet’s absorption temperature or albedo becomes more uniform, its entropy production tends to decrease. These findings underscore the need to monitor the absorption temperature and albedo both in nature and in climate models. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences American Meteorological Society

Towards Quantifying the Climate Heat Engine: Solar Absorption and Terrestrial Emission Temperatures and Material Entropy Production

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0469
eISSN
1520-0469
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAS-D-16-0240.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractA heat engine analysis of a climate system requires the determination of the solar absorption temperature and the terrestrial emission temperature. These temperatures are entropically defined as the ratio of the energy exchanged to the entropy produced. The emission temperature, shown here to be greater than or equal to the effective emission temperature, is relatively well known. In contrast, the absorption temperature requires radiative transfer calculations for its determination and is poorly known.The maximum material (i.e., nonradiative) entropy production of a planet’s steady-state climate system is a function of the absorption and emission temperatures. Because a climate system does no work, the material entropy production measures the system’s activity. The sensitivity of this production to changes in the emission and absorption temperatures is quantified. If Earth’s albedo does not change, material entropy production would increase by about five percent per one-degree increase in absorption temperature. If the absorption temperature does not change, entropy production would decrease by about four percent for a one percent decrease in albedo. We show that, as a planet’s emission temperature becomes more uniform, its entropy production tends to increase. Conversely, as a planet’s absorption temperature or albedo becomes more uniform, its entropy production tends to decrease. These findings underscore the need to monitor the absorption temperature and albedo both in nature and in climate models.

Journal

Journal of the Atmospheric SciencesAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 8, 2017

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