Time-lagged response of the Antarctic and high-latitude atmosphere to tropical MJO convection

Time-lagged response of the Antarctic and high-latitude atmosphere to tropical MJO convection AbstractIntraseasonal tropical variability has important implications for the mid- and high- latitude atmosphere, and in recent studies has been shown to modulate a number of weather processes in the Northern Hemisphere, such as snow depth, sea ice concentration, precipitation, atmospheric rivers, and air temperature. In such studies, the extratropical atmosphere, has tended to respond to the tropical convection of the leading mode of intraseasonal variability, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) with a time lag of approximately seven days. However, the time lag between the MJO and the Antarctic atmosphere has been found to vary between less than seven and greater than 20 days. This study builds on previous work by further examining the time-lagged response of Southern Hemisphere tropospheric circulation to tropical MJO forcing, with specific focus on the latitude belt associated with the Antarctic Oscillation, during the months of June (Austral winter) and December (Austral summer) using NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 data for the years 1979-2016.Principal findings indicate that the time lag with strongest height anomalies depends on both the location of the MJO convection (e.g., the MJO phase) and the season, and that the lagged height anomalies in the Antarctic atmosphere are fairly consistent across different vertical levels and latitudinal bands. In addition, certain MJO phases in December displayed lagged height anomalies indicative of blocking-type atmospheric patterns, with an approximate wavenumber of 4, whereas in June most phases were associated with more progressive height anomaly centers resembling a wavenumber-3 type pattern. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monthly Weather Review American Meteorological Society

Time-lagged response of the Antarctic and high-latitude atmosphere to tropical MJO convection

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0493
D.O.I.
10.1175/MWR-D-17-0224.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIntraseasonal tropical variability has important implications for the mid- and high- latitude atmosphere, and in recent studies has been shown to modulate a number of weather processes in the Northern Hemisphere, such as snow depth, sea ice concentration, precipitation, atmospheric rivers, and air temperature. In such studies, the extratropical atmosphere, has tended to respond to the tropical convection of the leading mode of intraseasonal variability, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) with a time lag of approximately seven days. However, the time lag between the MJO and the Antarctic atmosphere has been found to vary between less than seven and greater than 20 days. This study builds on previous work by further examining the time-lagged response of Southern Hemisphere tropospheric circulation to tropical MJO forcing, with specific focus on the latitude belt associated with the Antarctic Oscillation, during the months of June (Austral winter) and December (Austral summer) using NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 data for the years 1979-2016.Principal findings indicate that the time lag with strongest height anomalies depends on both the location of the MJO convection (e.g., the MJO phase) and the season, and that the lagged height anomalies in the Antarctic atmosphere are fairly consistent across different vertical levels and latitudinal bands. In addition, certain MJO phases in December displayed lagged height anomalies indicative of blocking-type atmospheric patterns, with an approximate wavenumber of 4, whereas in June most phases were associated with more progressive height anomaly centers resembling a wavenumber-3 type pattern.

Journal

Monthly Weather ReviewAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 12, 2018

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