Three-Dimensional Salt Dynamics in Well-Mixed Estuaries: Influence of Estuarine Convergence, Coriolis, and Bathymetry

Three-Dimensional Salt Dynamics in Well-Mixed Estuaries: Influence of Estuarine Convergence,... AbstractA semianalytical three-dimensional model is set up to dynamically calculate the coupled water motion and salinity for idealized well-mixed estuaries and prognostically investigate the influence of each physical mechanism on the residual salt transport. As a study case, a schematized estuary with an exponentially converging width and a channel–shoal structure is considered. The temporal correlation between horizontal tidal velocities and tidal salinities is the dominant process for the landward residual salt transport. The residual salt transport induced by residual circulation is locally significant, but the induced salt transport integrated over the cross section is small. The impacts of the estuarine geometry, Coriolis force, and bathymetry on the salt dynamics are studied using three dedicated experiments, in which the impact of each of these factors is studied separately. To assess the impact of width convergence, a convergent estuary without bathymetric variations or Coriolis force is considered. In this experiment, the temporal correlation between tidal velocities and salinities is the only landward salt transport process. In the second experiment, Coriolis effects are included. This results in a significant residual salt transport cell due to the advection of the tidally averaged salinity by residual circulation, with salt imported into the estuary from the left side and exported on the right (looking seaward). In the last experiment, a lateral channel–shoal structure is included while the Coriolis effects are excluded. This results in a significant landward salt transport through the deeper channel and a seaward salt transport over the shoals due to the advection of the tidally averaged salinity by residual circulation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Physical Oceanography American Meteorological Society

Three-Dimensional Salt Dynamics in Well-Mixed Estuaries: Influence of Estuarine Convergence, Coriolis, and Bathymetry

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0485
eISSN
1520-0485
D.O.I.
10.1175/JPO-D-16-0247.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractA semianalytical three-dimensional model is set up to dynamically calculate the coupled water motion and salinity for idealized well-mixed estuaries and prognostically investigate the influence of each physical mechanism on the residual salt transport. As a study case, a schematized estuary with an exponentially converging width and a channel–shoal structure is considered. The temporal correlation between horizontal tidal velocities and tidal salinities is the dominant process for the landward residual salt transport. The residual salt transport induced by residual circulation is locally significant, but the induced salt transport integrated over the cross section is small. The impacts of the estuarine geometry, Coriolis force, and bathymetry on the salt dynamics are studied using three dedicated experiments, in which the impact of each of these factors is studied separately. To assess the impact of width convergence, a convergent estuary without bathymetric variations or Coriolis force is considered. In this experiment, the temporal correlation between tidal velocities and salinities is the only landward salt transport process. In the second experiment, Coriolis effects are included. This results in a significant residual salt transport cell due to the advection of the tidally averaged salinity by residual circulation, with salt imported into the estuary from the left side and exported on the right (looking seaward). In the last experiment, a lateral channel–shoal structure is included while the Coriolis effects are excluded. This results in a significant landward salt transport through the deeper channel and a seaward salt transport over the shoals due to the advection of the tidally averaged salinity by residual circulation.

Journal

Journal of Physical OceanographyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 16, 2017

References

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