The U.S. National Blend of Models for Statistical Postprocessing of Probability of Precipitation and Deterministic Precipitation Amount

The U.S. National Blend of Models for Statistical Postprocessing of Probability of Precipitation... AbstractThe U.S. National Blend of Models provides statistically postprocessed, high-resolution multimodel ensemble guidance, providing National Weather Service forecasters with a calibrated, downscaled starting point for producing digital forecasts.Forecasts of 12-hourly probability of precipitation (POP12) over the contiguous United States are produced as follows: 1) Populate the forecast and analyze cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) to be used later in quantile mapping. Were every grid point processed without benefit of data from other points, 60 days of training data would likely be insufficient for estimating CDFs and adjusting the errors in the forecast. Accordingly, “supplemental” locations were identified for each grid point, and data from the supplemental locations were used to populate the forecast and analyzed CDFs used in the quantile mapping. 2) Load the real-time U.S. and Environment Canada (now known as Environment and Climate Change Canada) global deterministic and ensemble forecasts, interpolated to ⅛°. 3) Using CDFs from the past 60 days of data, apply a deterministic quantile mapping to the ensemble forecasts. 4) Dress the resulting ensemble with random noise. 5) Generate probabilities from the ensemble relative frequency. 6) Spatially smooth the forecast using a Savitzky–Golay smoother, applying more smoothing in flatter areas.Forecasts of 6-hourly quantitative precipitation (QPF06) are more simply produced as follows: 1) Form a grand ensemble mean, again interpolated to ⅛°. 2) Quantile map the mean forecast using CDFs of the ensemble mean and analyzed distributions. 3) Spatially smooth the field, similar to POP12.Results for spring 2016 are provided, demonstrating that the postprocessing improves POP12 reliability and skill, as well as the deterministic forecast bias, while maintaining sharpness and spatial detail. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monthly Weather Review American Meteorological Society

The U.S. National Blend of Models for Statistical Postprocessing of Probability of Precipitation and Deterministic Precipitation Amount

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0493
eISSN
1520-0493
D.O.I.
10.1175/MWR-D-16-0331.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe U.S. National Blend of Models provides statistically postprocessed, high-resolution multimodel ensemble guidance, providing National Weather Service forecasters with a calibrated, downscaled starting point for producing digital forecasts.Forecasts of 12-hourly probability of precipitation (POP12) over the contiguous United States are produced as follows: 1) Populate the forecast and analyze cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) to be used later in quantile mapping. Were every grid point processed without benefit of data from other points, 60 days of training data would likely be insufficient for estimating CDFs and adjusting the errors in the forecast. Accordingly, “supplemental” locations were identified for each grid point, and data from the supplemental locations were used to populate the forecast and analyzed CDFs used in the quantile mapping. 2) Load the real-time U.S. and Environment Canada (now known as Environment and Climate Change Canada) global deterministic and ensemble forecasts, interpolated to ⅛°. 3) Using CDFs from the past 60 days of data, apply a deterministic quantile mapping to the ensemble forecasts. 4) Dress the resulting ensemble with random noise. 5) Generate probabilities from the ensemble relative frequency. 6) Spatially smooth the forecast using a Savitzky–Golay smoother, applying more smoothing in flatter areas.Forecasts of 6-hourly quantitative precipitation (QPF06) are more simply produced as follows: 1) Form a grand ensemble mean, again interpolated to ⅛°. 2) Quantile map the mean forecast using CDFs of the ensemble mean and analyzed distributions. 3) Spatially smooth the field, similar to POP12.Results for spring 2016 are provided, demonstrating that the postprocessing improves POP12 reliability and skill, as well as the deterministic forecast bias, while maintaining sharpness and spatial detail.

Journal

Monthly Weather ReviewAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 26, 2017

References

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