The Tropical Air–Sea Propagation Study (TAPS)

The Tropical Air–Sea Propagation Study (TAPS) AbstractThe purpose of the Tropical Air–Sea Propagation Study (TAPS), which was conducted during November–December 2013, was to gather coordinated atmospheric and radio frequency (RF) data, offshore of northeastern Australia, in order to address the question of how well radio wave propagation can be predicted in a clear-air, tropical, littoral maritime environment. Spatiotemporal variations in vertical gradients of the conserved thermodynamic variables found in surface layers, mixing layers, and entrainment layers have the potential to bend or refract RF energy in directions that can either enhance or limit the intended function of an RF system. TAPS facilitated the collaboration of scientists and technologists from the United Kingdom, the United States, France, New Zealand, and Australia, bringing together expertise in boundary layer meteorology, mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP), and RF propagation. The focus of the study was on investigating for the first time in a tropical, littoral environment the i) refractivity structure in the marine and coastal inland boundary layers; ii) the spatial and temporal behavior of momentum, heat, and moisture fluxes; and iii) the ability of propagation models seeded with refractive index functions derived from blended NWP and surface-layer models to predict the propagation of radio wave signals of ultrahigh frequency (UHF; 300 MHz–3 GHz), super-high frequency (SHF; 3–30 GHz), and extremely high frequency (EHF; 30–300 GHz).Coordinated atmospheric and RF measurements were made using a small research aircraft, slow-ascent radiosondes, lidar, flux towers, a kitesonde, and land-based transmitters. The use of a ship as an RF-receiving platform facilitated variable-range RF links extending to distances of 80 km from the mainland. Four high-resolution NWP forecasting systems were employed to characterize environmental variability. This paper provides an overview of the TAPS experimental design and field campaign, including a description of the unique data that were collected, preliminary findings, and the envisaged interpretation of the results. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
eISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/BAMS-D-14-00284.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe purpose of the Tropical Air–Sea Propagation Study (TAPS), which was conducted during November–December 2013, was to gather coordinated atmospheric and radio frequency (RF) data, offshore of northeastern Australia, in order to address the question of how well radio wave propagation can be predicted in a clear-air, tropical, littoral maritime environment. Spatiotemporal variations in vertical gradients of the conserved thermodynamic variables found in surface layers, mixing layers, and entrainment layers have the potential to bend or refract RF energy in directions that can either enhance or limit the intended function of an RF system. TAPS facilitated the collaboration of scientists and technologists from the United Kingdom, the United States, France, New Zealand, and Australia, bringing together expertise in boundary layer meteorology, mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP), and RF propagation. The focus of the study was on investigating for the first time in a tropical, littoral environment the i) refractivity structure in the marine and coastal inland boundary layers; ii) the spatial and temporal behavior of momentum, heat, and moisture fluxes; and iii) the ability of propagation models seeded with refractive index functions derived from blended NWP and surface-layer models to predict the propagation of radio wave signals of ultrahigh frequency (UHF; 300 MHz–3 GHz), super-high frequency (SHF; 3–30 GHz), and extremely high frequency (EHF; 30–300 GHz).Coordinated atmospheric and RF measurements were made using a small research aircraft, slow-ascent radiosondes, lidar, flux towers, a kitesonde, and land-based transmitters. The use of a ship as an RF-receiving platform facilitated variable-range RF links extending to distances of 80 km from the mainland. Four high-resolution NWP forecasting systems were employed to characterize environmental variability. This paper provides an overview of the TAPS experimental design and field campaign, including a description of the unique data that were collected, preliminary findings, and the envisaged interpretation of the results.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 21, 2017

References

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