The Mean and Turbulent Properties of a Wildfire Convective Plume

The Mean and Turbulent Properties of a Wildfire Convective Plume AbstractThe time-mean and time-varying smoke and velocity structure of a wildfire convective plume is examined using a high-resolution scanning Doppler lidar. The mean plume is shown to exhibit the archetypal form of a bent-over plume in a crosswind, matching the well-established Briggs plume-rise equation. The plume cross section is approximately Gaussian and the plume radius increases linearly with height, consistent with plume-rise theory. The Briggs plume-rise equation is subsequently inverted to estimate the mean fire-generated sensible heat flux, which is found to be 87 kW m−2. The mean radial velocity structure of the plume indicates flow convergence into the plume base and regions of both convective overshoot and sinking flow in the upper plume. The updraft speed in the lower plume is estimated to be 13.5 m s−1 by tracking the leading edge of a convective element ascending through the plume. The lidar data also reveal aspects of entrainment processes during the plume rise. For example, the covariation of the radial velocity and smoke perturbations are shown to dilute the smoke concentration with height. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

The Mean and Turbulent Properties of a Wildfire Convective Plume

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0384.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe time-mean and time-varying smoke and velocity structure of a wildfire convective plume is examined using a high-resolution scanning Doppler lidar. The mean plume is shown to exhibit the archetypal form of a bent-over plume in a crosswind, matching the well-established Briggs plume-rise equation. The plume cross section is approximately Gaussian and the plume radius increases linearly with height, consistent with plume-rise theory. The Briggs plume-rise equation is subsequently inverted to estimate the mean fire-generated sensible heat flux, which is found to be 87 kW m−2. The mean radial velocity structure of the plume indicates flow convergence into the plume base and regions of both convective overshoot and sinking flow in the upper plume. The updraft speed in the lower plume is estimated to be 13.5 m s−1 by tracking the leading edge of a convective element ascending through the plume. The lidar data also reveal aspects of entrainment processes during the plume rise. For example, the covariation of the radial velocity and smoke perturbations are shown to dilute the smoke concentration with height.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 28, 2017

References

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