The Clear-Air Coastal Vespertine Radar Bands

The Clear-Air Coastal Vespertine Radar Bands It is known that the insects observed in the lower layers of the atmosphere produce radar echos and that their spatiotemporal distribution is strongly influenced by the meteorological conditions and the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. However, the available information on the subject essentially deals with the continental zones. Observations carried out from the Atlantic coast with a polarimetric Ka-band Doppler radar are used to show the existence of large band-shaped areas of insects above the coastal Atlantic Ocean, which has a reflectivity 3 102 times higher than the values usually observed inland. The insects collectively fly with a common heading. These bands form at dusk and are connected with the coastal atmospheric circulation, which carries along the local insect population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

The Clear-Air Coastal Vespertine Radar Bands

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/the-clear-air-coastal-vespertine-radar-bands-J1VOyyo5t2
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1996)077<0673:TCACVR>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is known that the insects observed in the lower layers of the atmosphere produce radar echos and that their spatiotemporal distribution is strongly influenced by the meteorological conditions and the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. However, the available information on the subject essentially deals with the continental zones. Observations carried out from the Atlantic coast with a polarimetric Ka-band Doppler radar are used to show the existence of large band-shaped areas of insects above the coastal Atlantic Ocean, which has a reflectivity 3 102 times higher than the values usually observed inland. The insects collectively fly with a common heading. These bands form at dusk and are connected with the coastal atmospheric circulation, which carries along the local insect population.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 23, 1996

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial