The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Programmatic Background and Design of the Cloud and Radiation Test Bed

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Programmatic Background and Design of the... The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a major new program of atmospheric measurement and modeling. The program is intended to improve the understanding of processes that affect atmospheric radiation and the description of these processes in climate models. An accurate description of atmospheric radiation and its interaction with clouds and cloud processes is necessary to improve the performance of and confidence in models used to study and predict climate change. The ARM Program will employ five (this paper was prepared prior to a decision to limit the number of primary measurement sites to three) highly instrumented primary measurement sites for up to 10 years at land and ocean locations, from the Tropics to the Arctic, and will conduct observations for shorter periods at additional sites and in specialized campaigns. Quantities to be measured at these sites include longwave and shortwave radiation, the spatial and temporal distribution of clouds, water vapor, temperature, and other radiation-influencing quantities. There will be further observations of meteorological variables that influence these quantities, including wind velocity, precipitation rate, surface moisture, temperature, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. These data will be used for the prospective testing of models of varying complexity, ranging from detailed process models to the highly parameterized description of these processes for use in general circulation models of the earth's atmosphere. This article reviews the scientific background of the ARM Program, describes the design of the program, and presents its status and plans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Programmatic Background and Design of the Cloud and Radiation Test Bed

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/the-atmospheric-radiation-measurement-arm-program-programmatic-PUidgWC5HI
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1994)075<1201:TARMPP>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a major new program of atmospheric measurement and modeling. The program is intended to improve the understanding of processes that affect atmospheric radiation and the description of these processes in climate models. An accurate description of atmospheric radiation and its interaction with clouds and cloud processes is necessary to improve the performance of and confidence in models used to study and predict climate change. The ARM Program will employ five (this paper was prepared prior to a decision to limit the number of primary measurement sites to three) highly instrumented primary measurement sites for up to 10 years at land and ocean locations, from the Tropics to the Arctic, and will conduct observations for shorter periods at additional sites and in specialized campaigns. Quantities to be measured at these sites include longwave and shortwave radiation, the spatial and temporal distribution of clouds, water vapor, temperature, and other radiation-influencing quantities. There will be further observations of meteorological variables that influence these quantities, including wind velocity, precipitation rate, surface moisture, temperature, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. These data will be used for the prospective testing of models of varying complexity, ranging from detailed process models to the highly parameterized description of these processes for use in general circulation models of the earth's atmosphere. This article reviews the scientific background of the ARM Program, describes the design of the program, and presents its status and plans.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 10, 1994

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial