Testing the Sensitivity of the Extratropical Response to the Location, Amplitude, and Propagation Speed of Tropical Convection

Testing the Sensitivity of the Extratropical Response to the Location, Amplitude, and Propagation... AbstractThe dynamical core of a dry global model is used to investigate the role of central Pacific versus warm pool tropical convection on the extratropical response over the North Pacific and North America. A series of model runs is performed in which the amplitude of the warm pool (WP) and central Pacific (CP) heating anomalies associated with the MJO and El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is systematically varied. In addition, model calculations based on each of the eight MJO phases are performed, first using stationary heating, and then with heating corresponding to a 48-day MJO cycle and to a 32-day MJO cycle.In all model runs, the extratropical response to tropical convection occurs within 7–10 days of the convective heating. The response is very sensitive to the relative amplitude of the heating anomalies. For example, when heating anomalies in the WP and CP have similar amplitude but opposite sign, the amplitude of the extratropical response is much weaker than is typical for the MJO and ENSO. For the MJO, when the WP heating anomaly is much stronger than the CP heating anomaly (vice versa for ENSO), the extratropical response is amplified. For the MJO heating, it is found that the extratropical responses to phases 4 and 8 are most distinct. A likely factor contributing to this distinctiveness involves the relative amplitude of the two heating anomalies. The stationary and moving (48- and 32-day) heating responses are very similar, revealing a lack of sensitivity to the MJO phase speed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences American Meteorological Society

Testing the Sensitivity of the Extratropical Response to the Location, Amplitude, and Propagation Speed of Tropical Convection

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/testing-the-sensitivity-of-the-extratropical-response-to-the-location-YDSJTo6b40
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0469
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAS-D-17-0132.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe dynamical core of a dry global model is used to investigate the role of central Pacific versus warm pool tropical convection on the extratropical response over the North Pacific and North America. A series of model runs is performed in which the amplitude of the warm pool (WP) and central Pacific (CP) heating anomalies associated with the MJO and El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is systematically varied. In addition, model calculations based on each of the eight MJO phases are performed, first using stationary heating, and then with heating corresponding to a 48-day MJO cycle and to a 32-day MJO cycle.In all model runs, the extratropical response to tropical convection occurs within 7–10 days of the convective heating. The response is very sensitive to the relative amplitude of the heating anomalies. For example, when heating anomalies in the WP and CP have similar amplitude but opposite sign, the amplitude of the extratropical response is much weaker than is typical for the MJO and ENSO. For the MJO, when the WP heating anomaly is much stronger than the CP heating anomaly (vice versa for ENSO), the extratropical response is amplified. For the MJO heating, it is found that the extratropical responses to phases 4 and 8 are most distinct. A likely factor contributing to this distinctiveness involves the relative amplitude of the two heating anomalies. The stationary and moving (48- and 32-day) heating responses are very similar, revealing a lack of sensitivity to the MJO phase speed.

Journal

Journal of the Atmospheric SciencesAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 25, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off