TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL about our members •/M Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., tics, atmospheric chemis- announced the appointment of Cecilia Sze as its new try, air quality and risk as- president and CEO. The move comes with the recent sessment, mathematical invitation to Nien Dak Sze, who along with Cecilia modeling , planetary founded AER, by the government of Hong Kong's science , atmospheric Central Policy Unit to become its part-time advisor on sounding, and systems en- the environment. Nien, the company's previous presi- gineering. In addition to its dent and CEO, will remain chairman of the board. Cambridge, Massachu- As cofounder of AER, Sze has served in various setts, headquarters, AER capacities from research to chief financial and opera- has offices in Washington, tions officer. In those various roles, she helped bring D.C.; San Francisco and AER from two employees concentrating on atmo- Los Angeles, California; spheric chemistry to its current size of nearly 100 with and Hong Kong and 10 research groups and five U.S. and international Beijing. branch offices. Under Sze's financial leadership, AER has never incurred a loss in its 22-year history. A $98 million contract has been awarded to ITT Sze earned a B.S. degree in chemistry from Purdue Industries, ITT Aerospace/Communications Divi- University and an M.S. in business administration sion of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, to develop an advanced from Northeastern University. She serves on the Ex- weather satellite instrument that will significantly ecutive Board of the Asian-American Bank and Trust, improve weather forecasting and climate prediction as as a trustee of Buckingham, Brown & Nichols School, part of a Clinton/Gore administration program to make and on the Corporate Executive Council of WGBH. government less costly, more efficient, and more re- Founded in 1977, AER is an environmental re- sponsive to public needs, Commerce Secretary Will- iam M. Daley announced. Daley said the new search and consulting company with expertise in re- instruments are part of the administration's National mote sensing, satellite meteorology, numerical Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite weather prediction, climatology, circulation diagnos- System (NPOESS) program, which will save the tax- payers about $1.8 billion over its lifetime after it is in operation sometime over the next decade. The savings will accrue as a result of the administration's initia- tive to combine the nation's military and civilian en- vironmental satellite programs into one, Daley said. "These satellite instruments will improve short- term weather forecasts and long-term climate predic- 1074 Mark Walden tion," Daley said. "The NPOESS program marks the 1075 William J. Karins most significant change in U.S. operational remote 1076 Scot Mundt 1999 sensing since the launch of the first weather satellite 1077 Craig Setzer 1999 in 1960," he said, adding that "the program heralds a 1078 Stephanie Walker 1999 new unified path for the United States in the develop- 1079 William M. Quinlan 1999 ment, acquisition, management, and operation of en- 1080 Alan E. Rios 1999 vironmental satellites." The contract is for a Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), an advanced high-spectral-resolution infrared 2322 Vol. 80, , No . 1 7, November 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.11.2378b
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Abstract

about our members •/M Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., tics, atmospheric chemis- announced the appointment of Cecilia Sze as its new try, air quality and risk as- president and CEO. The move comes with the recent sessment, mathematical invitation to Nien Dak Sze, who along with Cecilia modeling , planetary founded AER, by the government of Hong Kong's science , atmospheric Central Policy Unit to become its part-time advisor on sounding, and systems en- the environment. Nien, the company's previous presi- gineering. In addition to its dent and CEO, will remain chairman of the board. Cambridge, Massachu- As cofounder of AER, Sze has served in various setts, headquarters, AER capacities from research to chief financial and opera- has offices in Washington, tions officer. In those various roles, she helped bring D.C.; San Francisco and AER from two employees concentrating on atmo- Los Angeles, California; spheric chemistry to its current size of nearly 100 with and Hong Kong and 10 research groups and five U.S. and international Beijing. branch offices. Under Sze's financial leadership, AER has never incurred a loss in its 22-year history. A $98 million contract has been awarded to ITT Sze earned a B.S. degree in chemistry from Purdue Industries, ITT Aerospace/Communications Divi- University and an M.S. in business administration sion of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, to develop an advanced from Northeastern University. She serves on the Ex- weather satellite instrument that will significantly ecutive Board of the Asian-American Bank and Trust, improve weather forecasting and climate prediction as as a trustee of Buckingham, Brown & Nichols School, part of a Clinton/Gore administration program to make and on the Corporate Executive Council of WGBH. government less costly, more efficient, and more re- Founded in 1977, AER is an environmental re- sponsive to public needs, Commerce Secretary Will- iam M. Daley announced. Daley said the new search and consulting company with expertise in re- instruments are part of the administration's National mote sensing, satellite meteorology, numerical Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite weather prediction, climatology, circulation diagnos- System (NPOESS) program, which will save the tax- payers about $1.8 billion over its lifetime after it is in operation sometime over the next decade. The savings will accrue as a result of the administration's initia- tive to combine the nation's military and civilian en- vironmental satellite programs into one, Daley said. "These satellite instruments will improve short- term weather forecasts and long-term climate predic- 1074 Mark Walden tion," Daley said. "The NPOESS program marks the 1075 William J. Karins most significant change in U.S. operational remote 1076 Scot Mundt 1999 sensing since the launch of the first weather satellite 1077 Craig Setzer 1999 in 1960," he said, adding that "the program heralds a 1078 Stephanie Walker 1999 new unified path for the United States in the develop- 1079 William M. Quinlan 1999 ment, acquisition, management, and operation of en- 1080 Alan E. Rios 1999 vironmental satellites." The contract is for a Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), an advanced high-spectral-resolution infrared 2322 Vol. 80, , No . 1 7, November 1999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1999

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