TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL Miner began by giving a brief overview of the to discuss future lectures and field trips for the students storm, known as "Hurricane Huron." He explained that in the upcoming semester, secure financial matters for it began as a typical midlatitude cyclone and devel- the new chapter, and search for a new professor. The oped hurricanelike characteristics after stalling over chapter's first field trip was planned for 11 February Lake Huron for several days. The cyclone became 1999 at the National Weather Service (NWS) in Duluth, warm-cored, developed an eye, and exhibited spiral Minnesota. It will be led by Gary Austin, the science and rainbands typical of a tropical storm. These character- operations officer. This will be the first experience for istics were continuous and lasted for hours, present- most of the members to see what the NWS entails. ing a puzzling picture of how such a cyclone could The second objective was to talk about getting fund- develop in the midlatitudes in autumn. ing by the Northland College Student Association. To illustrate the special circumstances that caused This is quite important because it would mean no dues the cyclone to develop as it did, Miner used various for the students members and the possibility of pur- maps showing surface features, 1000-500-mb thick- chasing handheld weather monitoring devices for ness patterns, and vorticity. He went through each day storm chasing. Also, an open-ended discussion began in the lifetime of the storm, beginning on 11 Septem- on which qualifications the students would like to see ber and ending on 15 September, and explained what in the new meteorology professor for fall 1999. Emily he believed to have caused each stage in the storm's Faivre was elected as the student representative for the development. He went into great detail about how the hiring committee, and she took notes to present to the diabatic heating effects caused by the warm waters of committee. Lake Huron could have provided the extra energy Chapter President Ryan D. Fuller gave a brief re- needed for the storm to develop such unusual port of the 79th AMS Annual Meeting in Dallas, characteristics. Texas. His trip was sponsored by a National Science Miner closed by showing several satellite images Foundation scholarship he received as a part of the of Hurricane Huron, which further illustrated the Oklahoma Weather Center's REU. Fuller described points he made in the lecture. He then entertained a the lectures he attended, including one by Charles A. large number of questions from curious audience Doswell III entitled "Seeing Supercells as Heavy Rain members. Following the presentation, refreshments Producers." Fuller also described the activities of other were served.—Sarah Thomas. chapters and those he would like to see incorporated into the new chapter. Fuller would like to compliment Northlan d College those chapters that displayed posters, including those of the Texas A&M and the Central Oklahoma chap- The second meeting of the chapter was held on 20 ters, which were particularly well done. January 1999. The main objective of this meeting was Spring trip plans were debated and it was unani- mous that if the conditions were right, some storm chasing would take place. A visit to the National Se- TELEVISIO N SEAL S O F APPROVA L vere Storms Laboratory, Storm Prediction Center, Uni- versity of Oklahoma, and other various weather institutions around the southwest were considered. Finally, Chapter Secretary Andrew J. Siffert an- 1032 Jay Trobec 1999 nounced the construction of the chapter Web site 1033 Jacquelyn M. Ellis 1999 (www.northland.edu/students/ams/splash.html).—An- 1034 Jason Parkin 1999 drew Siffert. 1035 Brian G. Montgomery 1999 1036 Steven P. Garry 1999 Chicago 1037 Andrew C. Humphrey Jr. 1999 The chapter's 2 February 1999 (Groundhog Day) 1038 Steven K. Lee 1999 meeting was held in the Harold E. White Center of 1039 Michael A. Breunling 1999 Lewis University, with Chapter President Alan Sealls 1040 Stephen Cropper 1999 presiding. New business included a report by Herb Linda Gialanella 1999 Hoffman on the chapter's new Web site and with 1042 Josh Linker 1999 Hoffman requesting input from the membership on his new project. Dave Kleckner, United Air Lines meteo- 718 Vol. 80,, No. 4, April 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.4.718
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Abstract

Miner began by giving a brief overview of the to discuss future lectures and field trips for the students storm, known as "Hurricane Huron." He explained that in the upcoming semester, secure financial matters for it began as a typical midlatitude cyclone and devel- the new chapter, and search for a new professor. The oped hurricanelike characteristics after stalling over chapter's first field trip was planned for 11 February Lake Huron for several days. The cyclone became 1999 at the National Weather Service (NWS) in Duluth, warm-cored, developed an eye, and exhibited spiral Minnesota. It will be led by Gary Austin, the science and rainbands typical of a tropical storm. These character- operations officer. This will be the first experience for istics were continuous and lasted for hours, present- most of the members to see what the NWS entails. ing a puzzling picture of how such a cyclone could The second objective was to talk about getting fund- develop in the midlatitudes in autumn. ing by the Northland College Student Association. To illustrate the special circumstances that caused This is quite important because it would mean no dues the cyclone to develop as it did, Miner used various for the students members and the possibility of pur- maps showing surface features, 1000-500-mb thick- chasing handheld weather monitoring devices for ness patterns, and vorticity. He went through each day storm chasing. Also, an open-ended discussion began in the lifetime of the storm, beginning on 11 Septem- on which qualifications the students would like to see ber and ending on 15 September, and explained what in the new meteorology professor for fall 1999. Emily he believed to have caused each stage in the storm's Faivre was elected as the student representative for the development. He went into great detail about how the hiring committee, and she took notes to present to the diabatic heating effects caused by the warm waters of committee. Lake Huron could have provided the extra energy Chapter President Ryan D. Fuller gave a brief re- needed for the storm to develop such unusual port of the 79th AMS Annual Meeting in Dallas, characteristics. Texas. His trip was sponsored by a National Science Miner closed by showing several satellite images Foundation scholarship he received as a part of the of Hurricane Huron, which further illustrated the Oklahoma Weather Center's REU. Fuller described points he made in the lecture. He then entertained a the lectures he attended, including one by Charles A. large number of questions from curious audience Doswell III entitled "Seeing Supercells as Heavy Rain members. Following the presentation, refreshments Producers." Fuller also described the activities of other were served.—Sarah Thomas. chapters and those he would like to see incorporated into the new chapter. Fuller would like to compliment Northlan d College those chapters that displayed posters, including those of the Texas A&M and the Central Oklahoma chap- The second meeting of the chapter was held on 20 ters, which were particularly well done. January 1999. The main objective of this meeting was Spring trip plans were debated and it was unani- mous that if the conditions were right, some storm chasing would take place. A visit to the National Se- TELEVISIO N SEAL S O F APPROVA L vere Storms Laboratory, Storm Prediction Center, Uni- versity of Oklahoma, and other various weather institutions around the southwest were considered. Finally, Chapter Secretary Andrew J. Siffert an- 1032 Jay Trobec 1999 nounced the construction of the chapter Web site 1033 Jacquelyn M. Ellis 1999 (www.northland.edu/students/ams/splash.html).—An- 1034 Jason Parkin 1999 drew Siffert. 1035 Brian G. Montgomery 1999 1036 Steven P. Garry 1999 Chicago 1037 Andrew C. Humphrey Jr. 1999 The chapter's 2 February 1999 (Groundhog Day) 1038 Steven K. Lee 1999 meeting was held in the Harold E. White Center of 1039 Michael A. Breunling 1999 Lewis University, with Chapter President Alan Sealls 1040 Stephen Cropper 1999 presiding. New business included a report by Herb Linda Gialanella 1999 Hoffman on the chapter's new Web site and with 1042 Josh Linker 1999 Hoffman requesting input from the membership on his new project. Dave Kleckner, United Air Lines meteo- 718 Vol. 80,, No. 4, April 1999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 1999

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