TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL Waldman discussed future meeting programs and an- talk focused on optimizing the Integrated Terminal nounced that Harry Volkman of Fox TV Chicago would Weather System (ITWS) microburst detection algo- address the chapter annual meeting on 14 May 1999. rithm in dry environments, while Isaminger discussed Volkman celebrated his 50th year of continuous ser- the results of optimizing the ITWS Anomalous Propa- vice as a broadcast meteorologist on 16 January 1999. gation Editing (APEDIT) algorithm. Proseus's study The speaker for the evening was William J. explored the contention that in a typically wet envi- Johnson, chapter secretary. Johnson has been an ob- ronment an adaptive Vertically Integrated Liquid server in the NWS's Cooperative Observer program Water (VIL) threshold would be more effective in the for 25 years. The title of his presentation was "The detection of low-reflectivity events. In dry environ- Effect of Ground Water Tables and How They Affect ments, the detection algorithm performance dimin- the Zone of Saturation." ishes on low reflectivity days due to extremely low VIL values. Therefore, a sounding test is used to de- In addition to his precipitation and temperature termine if the atmosphere is wet or dry. Two different measuring instruments, Johnson constructed three event validation tests are needed in a dry environment: wells on his property in 1983 to measure ground wa- on dry days a reflectivity test rather than a VIL test ter levels. The wells are 9.5 ft deep and about 4 inches would be utilized, and on wet days, a lower VIL thresh- in diameter. He explained how it he has taken daily old would be used. Isaminger's presentation examined measurements and some of his findings uncovered that the APEDIT algorithm failure mechanisms in detail there was a monthly average of 2.75 days when a half to identify possible site-adaptable parameter changes inch or more of precipitation was measured. In addi- that can be used to improve the performance for mixed tion, there was a 17.8-day average interlude between weather/anomalous propagation (AP) events. While half inch or precipitation observations. There had been the current parameter set edits the majority of AP, there an average of 12 days per month when measurable pre- were cases where the performance was significantly cipitation (0.01 inches or more)occurred. degraded, especially if the AP returns were located Johnson tracked the number of days when he had near weather echoes or clear-air data in the composite at least a foot rise or fall in the water table and found maps. the average of these events to be three days per month. This event seems to agree closely with the days on They pointed out that by modifying the parameter which a half inch or more of liquid precipitation was set to be more aggressive resulted in a significant in- measured. Johnson said he has also utilized the data crease in AP editing performance with only a slight to determine the extent and severity of droughts, to de- increase in the editing of weather (mostly reduced by termine the depth of the frozen ground, and to estimate one level).—Benjamin Boorman. • how much runoff can be anticipated. In addition to his duties as a NWS cooperative ob- server, Johnson shares his unique ground water level data collection with the NWS, the Illinois State Wa- ter Survey, a media outlet, and with his local library in Streamwood, Illinois.—Paul Dailey. Memphis The second meeting of the 1998-99 year was held on 17 November 1998. The evening commenced with a brief business meeting. Items of interest included an 1011 Andrew P. Kuehn 1998 announcement that both the NWS and the Federal 1012 Jeremy Cooper 1998 Aviation Administration's Program Support Facility 1013 James P. Lanson 1998 are currently hiring new personnel. Dues were also col- lected for the 1998-99 academic year. 1028 Jason Stiff 1998 The speakers for the evening were Erik Proseus and 1029 Mark Danon 1998 Mark Isaminger, both employed by MIT Lincoln 1030 Charles R. Salser 1998 Laboratory. Lincoln Lab currently operates four avia- 1031 Kristen R. Cornett 1999 tion weather-related research field site locations in the United States, one of which is in Memphis. Proseus's 502 Vol. 80,, No. 3, March J 999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

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American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.3.502
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Abstract

Waldman discussed future meeting programs and an- talk focused on optimizing the Integrated Terminal nounced that Harry Volkman of Fox TV Chicago would Weather System (ITWS) microburst detection algo- address the chapter annual meeting on 14 May 1999. rithm in dry environments, while Isaminger discussed Volkman celebrated his 50th year of continuous ser- the results of optimizing the ITWS Anomalous Propa- vice as a broadcast meteorologist on 16 January 1999. gation Editing (APEDIT) algorithm. Proseus's study The speaker for the evening was William J. explored the contention that in a typically wet envi- Johnson, chapter secretary. Johnson has been an ob- ronment an adaptive Vertically Integrated Liquid server in the NWS's Cooperative Observer program Water (VIL) threshold would be more effective in the for 25 years. The title of his presentation was "The detection of low-reflectivity events. In dry environ- Effect of Ground Water Tables and How They Affect ments, the detection algorithm performance dimin- the Zone of Saturation." ishes on low reflectivity days due to extremely low VIL values. Therefore, a sounding test is used to de- In addition to his precipitation and temperature termine if the atmosphere is wet or dry. Two different measuring instruments, Johnson constructed three event validation tests are needed in a dry environment: wells on his property in 1983 to measure ground wa- on dry days a reflectivity test rather than a VIL test ter levels. The wells are 9.5 ft deep and about 4 inches would be utilized, and on wet days, a lower VIL thresh- in diameter. He explained how it he has taken daily old would be used. Isaminger's presentation examined measurements and some of his findings uncovered that the APEDIT algorithm failure mechanisms in detail there was a monthly average of 2.75 days when a half to identify possible site-adaptable parameter changes inch or more of precipitation was measured. In addi- that can be used to improve the performance for mixed tion, there was a 17.8-day average interlude between weather/anomalous propagation (AP) events. While half inch or precipitation observations. There had been the current parameter set edits the majority of AP, there an average of 12 days per month when measurable pre- were cases where the performance was significantly cipitation (0.01 inches or more)occurred. degraded, especially if the AP returns were located Johnson tracked the number of days when he had near weather echoes or clear-air data in the composite at least a foot rise or fall in the water table and found maps. the average of these events to be three days per month. This event seems to agree closely with the days on They pointed out that by modifying the parameter which a half inch or more of liquid precipitation was set to be more aggressive resulted in a significant in- measured. Johnson said he has also utilized the data crease in AP editing performance with only a slight to determine the extent and severity of droughts, to de- increase in the editing of weather (mostly reduced by termine the depth of the frozen ground, and to estimate one level).—Benjamin Boorman. • how much runoff can be anticipated. In addition to his duties as a NWS cooperative ob- server, Johnson shares his unique ground water level data collection with the NWS, the Illinois State Wa- ter Survey, a media outlet, and with his local library in Streamwood, Illinois.—Paul Dailey. Memphis The second meeting of the 1998-99 year was held on 17 November 1998. The evening commenced with a brief business meeting. Items of interest included an 1011 Andrew P. Kuehn 1998 announcement that both the NWS and the Federal 1012 Jeremy Cooper 1998 Aviation Administration's Program Support Facility 1013 James P. Lanson 1998 are currently hiring new personnel. Dues were also col- lected for the 1998-99 academic year. 1028 Jason Stiff 1998 The speakers for the evening were Erik Proseus and 1029 Mark Danon 1998 Mark Isaminger, both employed by MIT Lincoln 1030 Charles R. Salser 1998 Laboratory. Lincoln Lab currently operates four avia- 1031 Kristen R. Cornett 1999 tion weather-related research field site locations in the United States, one of which is in Memphis. Proseus's 502 Vol. 80,, No. 3, March J 999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1999

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