TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL and count them when they are returned. The election Nevada's climate went from a dry August with above- will be held during December, by mail, and the new normal temperatures, to a wet and cool September, to officers will be installed at the January meeting. a dry and cool October and early November. Reynolds then read the tentative schedule and sub- Steve Brown, meteorologist-in-charge of the Reno ject matter of meetings for the January-June time pe- NWS office, then presented a weather briefing for the riod. In January, chapter member Jerry Roberson will chapter. He summarized the synoptic pattern over North America with expected weather in Nevada and present a talk on a mesonet of instruments he has work- the west for the next couple of weeks. Brown then de- ing in his area, and there will be a discussion on aerial livered the featured talk of the evening, "La Nina and agricultural application. Reynolds will present a talk Its Effect on Northern Nevada." on weather lore (folklore) at the February meeting, and Scott Blair and George Hoeltzman will expand on their Following a discussion of what comprises a La Nina storm chasing activities in March. The April meeting's event, Brown reviewed the latest seasonal outlooks guest speaker will be Ed Buckner, who will provide a highlighting La Nina's effects on North America. talk on Channel 11 operations. If severe weather in- While strong correlations exist for wetter than normal tervenes, the latest video from "The Tornado Project" conditions in the Pacific Northwest and warmer and will be presented. In May, visiting scientist Ron Holle drier than normal conditions in the southwest, no such will present a talk on lightning, and the annual chap- correlations exist for northern Nevada. However, in re- ter picnic will be held in June. viewing past data, Brown pointed out that during pre- vious La Nina winters, northern Nevada had drier and For the remainder of the evening, Wilken provided colder than normal weather about 7 out of 10 times. a presentation on winter weather forecasting and ter- Thus, there is about a 75% chance that the 1998-99 minology. A discussion took place after the presenta- winter in northern Nevada will be drier and colder than tion.—Newton Skiles. average. These types of outlooks are very important Jackson Chapter for northern Nevada as the region gets most of its sum- mer water supply from snowmelt from the Sierra and The 17 November 1998 meeting was held at Mis- northern Nevada mountains.—Roger Lamoni. sissippi College in Clinton. After a brief business meeting, the program for the afternoon began. The pro- Arkansa s gram consisted of a panel discussion with the topic Acting President Jerry Reynolds convened the "Women in Science." Panelists included Reba Harrell, meeting with 12 members in attendance. Reynolds a biologist who works for the Jackson public school called for the reading of the minutes of the last meet- district; Barbara Powell, coordinator of the Center for ing and the treasurer's report from Secretary/Treasurer Excellence in Research, Training, and Learning at George Wilken. The minutes and treasurer's report Jackson State University; and Barbie Bassett, broad- were accepted by the membership. A brief discussion cast meteorologist. Each panelist provided background was held on the upcoming Christmas party on 13 De- information and then the floor was opened for ques- cember 1998, which will be held at the NWS office in tions. Topics discussed included how to interest young children in science, the increasing number of women North Little Rock. in the field of broadcast meteorology, sexual harass- Reynolds then talked about upcoming chapter elec- ment and discrimination, and salaries for women in tions. A candidate for the position of secretary/trea- science fields.—Brad Regan and Alan Gerard.• surer is still needed. Wilken will be a candidate for president, Reynolds for vice president, and Newton Skiles for corresponding secretary. Some prospects for the open position will be contacted to obtain their pos- sible interest. Reynolds stated that it was hoped that more than one person would run for each office. Wilken restated the fact that the chapter president must 101 4 Anthony J. Mainolf i 1998 be both a chapter member and a national member of 101 5 John H. Oldshu e 1998 each organization, so this might reduce the field for 101 6 Sean M. Nola n 1998 this position. 101 7 Kenneth T. Brewe r 1998 Erwin Prater and Damon Poole volunteered to be the election committee and will compile the ballots Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 127 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

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Abstract

and count them when they are returned. The election Nevada's climate went from a dry August with above- will be held during December, by mail, and the new normal temperatures, to a wet and cool September, to officers will be installed at the January meeting. a dry and cool October and early November. Reynolds then read the tentative schedule and sub- Steve Brown, meteorologist-in-charge of the Reno ject matter of meetings for the January-June time pe- NWS office, then presented a weather briefing for the riod. In January, chapter member Jerry Roberson will chapter. He summarized the synoptic pattern over North America with expected weather in Nevada and present a talk on a mesonet of instruments he has work- the west for the next couple of weeks. Brown then de- ing in his area, and there will be a discussion on aerial livered the featured talk of the evening, "La Nina and agricultural application. Reynolds will present a talk Its Effect on Northern Nevada." on weather lore (folklore) at the February meeting, and Scott Blair and George Hoeltzman will expand on their Following a discussion of what comprises a La Nina storm chasing activities in March. The April meeting's event, Brown reviewed the latest seasonal outlooks guest speaker will be Ed Buckner, who will provide a highlighting La Nina's effects on North America. talk on Channel 11 operations. If severe weather in- While strong correlations exist for wetter than normal tervenes, the latest video from "The Tornado Project" conditions in the Pacific Northwest and warmer and will be presented. In May, visiting scientist Ron Holle drier than normal conditions in the southwest, no such will present a talk on lightning, and the annual chap- correlations exist for northern Nevada. However, in re- ter picnic will be held in June. viewing past data, Brown pointed out that during pre- vious La Nina winters, northern Nevada had drier and For the remainder of the evening, Wilken provided colder than normal weather about 7 out of 10 times. a presentation on winter weather forecasting and ter- Thus, there is about a 75% chance that the 1998-99 minology. A discussion took place after the presenta- winter in northern Nevada will be drier and colder than tion.—Newton Skiles. average. These types of outlooks are very important Jackson Chapter for northern Nevada as the region gets most of its sum- mer water supply from snowmelt from the Sierra and The 17 November 1998 meeting was held at Mis- northern Nevada mountains.—Roger Lamoni. sissippi College in Clinton. After a brief business meeting, the program for the afternoon began. The pro- Arkansa s gram consisted of a panel discussion with the topic Acting President Jerry Reynolds convened the "Women in Science." Panelists included Reba Harrell, meeting with 12 members in attendance. Reynolds a biologist who works for the Jackson public school called for the reading of the minutes of the last meet- district; Barbara Powell, coordinator of the Center for ing and the treasurer's report from Secretary/Treasurer Excellence in Research, Training, and Learning at George Wilken. The minutes and treasurer's report Jackson State University; and Barbie Bassett, broad- were accepted by the membership. A brief discussion cast meteorologist. Each panelist provided background was held on the upcoming Christmas party on 13 De- information and then the floor was opened for ques- cember 1998, which will be held at the NWS office in tions. Topics discussed included how to interest young children in science, the increasing number of women North Little Rock. in the field of broadcast meteorology, sexual harass- Reynolds then talked about upcoming chapter elec- ment and discrimination, and salaries for women in tions. A candidate for the position of secretary/trea- science fields.—Brad Regan and Alan Gerard.• surer is still needed. Wilken will be a candidate for president, Reynolds for vice president, and Newton Skiles for corresponding secretary. Some prospects for the open position will be contacted to obtain their pos- sible interest. Reynolds stated that it was hoped that more than one person would run for each office. Wilken restated the fact that the chapter president must 101 4 Anthony J. Mainolf i 1998 be both a chapter member and a national member of 101 5 John H. Oldshu e 1998 each organization, so this might reduce the field for 101 6 Sean M. Nola n 1998 this position. 101 7 Kenneth T. Brewe r 1998 Erwin Prater and Damon Poole volunteered to be the election committee and will compile the ballots Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 127

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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