TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL Chapter Program Chairman Lance Pyle called the surface pressure during the 1978 storm was less than meeting to order and introduced O'Hara to the group. 960 mb but the surface pressure during the 1999 storm O'Hara began his presentation by clarifying that the was not less than 990 mb. Third, the winds and wind two snowstorms he was going to be discussing were gusts were different in both storms. In the 1978 storm, the January 1978 blizzard and the January 1999 snow- the winds were 70-80 mph with gusts to 100 mph. In storm. He started explaining aspects of the 1978 bliz- the 1999 storm, the winds were half as strong. There zard by showing upper air maps for 25-27 January and were also many more power outages during the 1978 then talked about the surface features throughout this storm as well as more major roads and highways period. Very cold air was being advected into the Great closed for days probably due to the higher winds.— Lakes region and lake effect snows began bearing Christine Zagorski. down on Michigan. Snowfall totals west of the low Asheville pressure were about 15 to 20 inches. Even heavier to- tals were found in southwest Michigan, northwest In- The Asheville chapter held the second meeting in diana , and north of Lake Superior in the upper 1999-2000 in Laurel Forum, Karpen Hall at the Uni- peninsula of Michigan due to lake effect snow. versity of North Carolina at Asheville on 18 Novem- ber 1999. Thirty-four people attended the meeting. O'Hara then talked about the aspects of the 1999 September meeting minutes and treasurer's report snowstorm. He explained aspects of the 1999 snow- were read and passed. Chapter President Ron Lowther storm by showing upper-air maps for 1- 3 January and and Chapter Vice President Kenneth Walters gave a then about the surface features throughout this period. brief discussion on future meetings and planning. Northwest flow began to cause lake effect snows into Michigan and since the lakes were not frozen, there Members were encouraged to participate in a Decem- wa s plenty of moisture to cause high snowfall ber climate forecast contest. amounts. Fifteen to twenty inches of snow fell in The speaker of the night was Tom Karl, director of northwest Indiana, northeast Illinois, and southwest the National Climatic Data Center. His presentation lower Michigan. was entitled "Observed Climate Change and Variabil- There were three similarities between these two ity: A Preview of the IPCC 2000 Assessment Panel." storms. First, the path of the surface low was similar Karl discussed the trends of temperature, precipitation, in both storms. It started out as a panhandle low and it and extreme weather in the last decade. He presented moved through the Ohio Valley and into the Great various approaches, different data sources, and tedious Lakes. Second, both upper-level systems showed a cross-calibrations to investigate the global climate, and negative tilt, although the 1978 trough showed a he suggested that there was a balance of evidence. He slightly more pronounced tilt. Third, both systems stated that more variations had been occurring in the generated relatively heavy snowfall, although the 1978 past decade due to natural and man-made causes. He snowfall was slightly greater than 1999. There were also pointed out the confidence levels and uncertain- also three differences. First, the track of the low dif- ties in applying these observed data to the future cli- fered in both storms. In the 1978 storm, the low moved mate prediction. In conclusion, Karl stated that, through Ohio and into Ontario and in 1999 the low "Overall, observed patterns of climate change suggest moved through Indiana, lower Michigan, and Ontario. human influence on global climate, there remains Second, the strength of each storm was different. The smaller uncertainty compared to IPCC 1995." At the end of presentation, Lowther presented Karl with a desktop clock engraved with the seal of Asheville chapter as a token of appreciation. More than 10 door prizes were also given out to the audience for their participation.— Alex Huang. Northern Nevada The first chapter meeting of 2000 was held at the 1105 Michael W. Nichols 2000 Desert Research Institute in Reno. A special dinner and social hour was held prior to the meeting to welcome the special guest speakers recruited for the meeting. To begin the meeting, Steve Otteson from the NWS Vol. 8 7, No. 4, April 2000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

TELEVISION SEALS OF APPROVAL

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Abstract

Chapter Program Chairman Lance Pyle called the surface pressure during the 1978 storm was less than meeting to order and introduced O'Hara to the group. 960 mb but the surface pressure during the 1999 storm O'Hara began his presentation by clarifying that the was not less than 990 mb. Third, the winds and wind two snowstorms he was going to be discussing were gusts were different in both storms. In the 1978 storm, the January 1978 blizzard and the January 1999 snow- the winds were 70-80 mph with gusts to 100 mph. In storm. He started explaining aspects of the 1978 bliz- the 1999 storm, the winds were half as strong. There zard by showing upper air maps for 25-27 January and were also many more power outages during the 1978 then talked about the surface features throughout this storm as well as more major roads and highways period. Very cold air was being advected into the Great closed for days probably due to the higher winds.— Lakes region and lake effect snows began bearing Christine Zagorski. down on Michigan. Snowfall totals west of the low Asheville pressure were about 15 to 20 inches. Even heavier to- tals were found in southwest Michigan, northwest In- The Asheville chapter held the second meeting in diana , and north of Lake Superior in the upper 1999-2000 in Laurel Forum, Karpen Hall at the Uni- peninsula of Michigan due to lake effect snow. versity of North Carolina at Asheville on 18 Novem- ber 1999. Thirty-four people attended the meeting. O'Hara then talked about the aspects of the 1999 September meeting minutes and treasurer's report snowstorm. He explained aspects of the 1999 snow- were read and passed. Chapter President Ron Lowther storm by showing upper-air maps for 1- 3 January and and Chapter Vice President Kenneth Walters gave a then about the surface features throughout this period. brief discussion on future meetings and planning. Northwest flow began to cause lake effect snows into Michigan and since the lakes were not frozen, there Members were encouraged to participate in a Decem- wa s plenty of moisture to cause high snowfall ber climate forecast contest. amounts. Fifteen to twenty inches of snow fell in The speaker of the night was Tom Karl, director of northwest Indiana, northeast Illinois, and southwest the National Climatic Data Center. His presentation lower Michigan. was entitled "Observed Climate Change and Variabil- There were three similarities between these two ity: A Preview of the IPCC 2000 Assessment Panel." storms. First, the path of the surface low was similar Karl discussed the trends of temperature, precipitation, in both storms. It started out as a panhandle low and it and extreme weather in the last decade. He presented moved through the Ohio Valley and into the Great various approaches, different data sources, and tedious Lakes. Second, both upper-level systems showed a cross-calibrations to investigate the global climate, and negative tilt, although the 1978 trough showed a he suggested that there was a balance of evidence. He slightly more pronounced tilt. Third, both systems stated that more variations had been occurring in the generated relatively heavy snowfall, although the 1978 past decade due to natural and man-made causes. He snowfall was slightly greater than 1999. There were also pointed out the confidence levels and uncertain- also three differences. First, the track of the low dif- ties in applying these observed data to the future cli- fered in both storms. In the 1978 storm, the low moved mate prediction. In conclusion, Karl stated that, through Ohio and into Ontario and in 1999 the low "Overall, observed patterns of climate change suggest moved through Indiana, lower Michigan, and Ontario. human influence on global climate, there remains Second, the strength of each storm was different. The smaller uncertainty compared to IPCC 1995." At the end of presentation, Lowther presented Karl with a desktop clock engraved with the seal of Asheville chapter as a token of appreciation. More than 10 door prizes were also given out to the audience for their participation.— Alex Huang. Northern Nevada The first chapter meeting of 2000 was held at the 1105 Michael W. Nichols 2000 Desert Research Institute in Reno. A special dinner and social hour was held prior to the meeting to welcome the special guest speakers recruited for the meeting. To begin the meeting, Steve Otteson from the NWS Vol. 8 7, No. 4, April 2000

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 1, 2000

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