Teaching Upper-Atmospheric Meteorology Using Two- and Three-Dimensional Models

Teaching Upper-Atmospheric Meteorology Using Two- and Three-Dimensional Models Teaching Upper-Atmospheric Meteorology Using Two- and Three-Dimensional Models a Pilot Study yb t itmo Hy w . Hwkinas , k yl aa J. k i p Ht a r , a n d Ja n e t s . s m it H pper-atmosphere meteorological concepts often hypothesized that males would outperform females confound introductory meteorology students. In especially when using the three-dimensional model, U particular, students are challenged by the three- given some studies showing differences in spatial pro- dimensional nature of constant-pressure surfaces. cessing abilities between males and females (see next This struggle is likely due, in part, to the fact that section). This study serves as an initial inquiry into nearly all representations of these three-dimensional this area of teaching research. By requiring relatively surfaces are presented in two dimensions. Recent little classroom time, this study helps to establish the research argues that spatial visualization in three merit of devoting significant classroom time to future dimensions can be improved through instruction. research. As the ultimate goal of any type of teaching However, several studies suggest that comprehension research is to improve student learning, it must first be of a three-dimensional environment does not neces- demonstrated that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Teaching Upper-Atmospheric Meteorology Using Two- and Three-Dimensional Models

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/teaching-upper-atmospheric-meteorology-using-two-and-three-dimensional-IXvxhqYLBf
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/2010BAMS2825.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Teaching Upper-Atmospheric Meteorology Using Two- and Three-Dimensional Models a Pilot Study yb t itmo Hy w . Hwkinas , k yl aa J. k i p Ht a r , a n d Ja n e t s . s m it H pper-atmosphere meteorological concepts often hypothesized that males would outperform females confound introductory meteorology students. In especially when using the three-dimensional model, U particular, students are challenged by the three- given some studies showing differences in spatial pro- dimensional nature of constant-pressure surfaces. cessing abilities between males and females (see next This struggle is likely due, in part, to the fact that section). This study serves as an initial inquiry into nearly all representations of these three-dimensional this area of teaching research. By requiring relatively surfaces are presented in two dimensions. Recent little classroom time, this study helps to establish the research argues that spatial visualization in three merit of devoting significant classroom time to future dimensions can be improved through instruction. research. As the ultimate goal of any type of teaching However, several studies suggest that comprehension research is to improve student learning, it must first be of a three-dimensional environment does not neces- demonstrated that

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 2010

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial