Submesoscale Dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Part II: Temperature–Salinity Relations and Cross-Shelf Transport Processes

Submesoscale Dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Part II: Temperature–Salinity Relations... AbstractThis paper, the second of three, investigates submesoscale dynamics in the northern Gulf of Mexico under the influence of the Mississippi–Atchafalaya River system, using numerical simulations at 500-m horizontal resolution with climatological atmospheric forcing. The Turner angle Tu, a measure of the relative effect of temperature and salinity on density, is examined with respect to submesoscale current generation in runs with and without riverine forcing. Surface Tu probability density functions in solutions including rivers show a temperature-dominated signal offshore, associated with Loop Current water, and a nearshore salinity-dominated signal, associated with fresh river water, without a clear compensating signal, as often found instead in the ocean’s mixed layer. The corresponding probability distribution functions in the absence of rivers differ, illustrating the key role played by the freshwater output in determining temperature–salinity distributions in the northern Gulf of Mexico during both winter and summer. A quantity referred to as temperature–salinity covariance is proposed to determine what fraction of the available potential energy that is released during the generation of submesoscale circulations leads to the destruction of density gradients while leaving spice gradients untouched, thereby leading to compensation. It is shown that the fresh river fronts to the east of the Bird’s Foot can evolve toward compensation in concert with a gradual release of available potential energy. It is further demonstrated that, during winter, the cross-shelf freshwater transport mechanism to the west of the Bird’s Foot is well approximated by a diffusive process, whereas to the east is better represented by a ballistic process associated with the Mississippi water that converges in a jetlike pattern. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Physical Oceanography American Meteorological Society

Submesoscale Dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Part II: Temperature–Salinity Relations and Cross-Shelf Transport Processes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/submesoscale-dynamics-in-the-northern-gulf-of-mexico-part-ii-EIo8Bd0K5F
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0485
D.O.I.
10.1175/JPO-D-17-0040.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper, the second of three, investigates submesoscale dynamics in the northern Gulf of Mexico under the influence of the Mississippi–Atchafalaya River system, using numerical simulations at 500-m horizontal resolution with climatological atmospheric forcing. The Turner angle Tu, a measure of the relative effect of temperature and salinity on density, is examined with respect to submesoscale current generation in runs with and without riverine forcing. Surface Tu probability density functions in solutions including rivers show a temperature-dominated signal offshore, associated with Loop Current water, and a nearshore salinity-dominated signal, associated with fresh river water, without a clear compensating signal, as often found instead in the ocean’s mixed layer. The corresponding probability distribution functions in the absence of rivers differ, illustrating the key role played by the freshwater output in determining temperature–salinity distributions in the northern Gulf of Mexico during both winter and summer. A quantity referred to as temperature–salinity covariance is proposed to determine what fraction of the available potential energy that is released during the generation of submesoscale circulations leads to the destruction of density gradients while leaving spice gradients untouched, thereby leading to compensation. It is shown that the fresh river fronts to the east of the Bird’s Foot can evolve toward compensation in concert with a gradual release of available potential energy. It is further demonstrated that, during winter, the cross-shelf freshwater transport mechanism to the west of the Bird’s Foot is well approximated by a diffusive process, whereas to the east is better represented by a ballistic process associated with the Mississippi water that converges in a jetlike pattern.

Journal

Journal of Physical OceanographyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 27, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off