Strengths and Limitations of Current Radar Systems for Two Stakeholder Groups in the Southern Plains

Strengths and Limitations of Current Radar Systems for Two Stakeholder Groups in the Southern Plains Advancements in radar technology since the deployment of the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) network have prompted consideration of radar replacement technologies. In order for the outcomes of advanced radar research and development to be the most beneficial to users, an understanding of user needs must be established early in the process and considered throughout. As an important early step in addressing this need, this study explored the strengths and limitations of current radar systems for nine participants from two key stakeholder groups: NOAA's NWS and broadcast meteorologists. Critical incident interviews revealed the role of each stakeholder group and attained stories that exemplified radar strengths and limitations in their respective roles.NWS forecasters emphasized using radar as an essential tool to assess the current weather situation and communicate hazards to key stakeholder groups. TV broadcasters emphasized adding meaning and value to NWS information and using radar to effectively communicate weather information to viewers. The stories told by our participants vividly illustrated the advancing nature of weather detection with radar, and why there are still issues with weather radar and radar-derived information. Analysis of the stories, which ranged from accounts of severe weather to winter weather, revealed four underlying radar needs: 1) clean, accurate data without intervention, 2) higher spatial-and temporal-resolution data than that provided by the WSR-88D, 3) consistent and low-altitude information, and 4) more accurate information on precipitation type, size, intensity, and distribution. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Strengths and Limitations of Current Radar Systems for Two Stakeholder Groups in the Southern Plains

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/2009BAMS2830.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Advancements in radar technology since the deployment of the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) network have prompted consideration of radar replacement technologies. In order for the outcomes of advanced radar research and development to be the most beneficial to users, an understanding of user needs must be established early in the process and considered throughout. As an important early step in addressing this need, this study explored the strengths and limitations of current radar systems for nine participants from two key stakeholder groups: NOAA's NWS and broadcast meteorologists. Critical incident interviews revealed the role of each stakeholder group and attained stories that exemplified radar strengths and limitations in their respective roles.NWS forecasters emphasized using radar as an essential tool to assess the current weather situation and communicate hazards to key stakeholder groups. TV broadcasters emphasized adding meaning and value to NWS information and using radar to effectively communicate weather information to viewers. The stories told by our participants vividly illustrated the advancing nature of weather detection with radar, and why there are still issues with weather radar and radar-derived information. Analysis of the stories, which ranged from accounts of severe weather to winter weather, revealed four underlying radar needs: 1) clean, accurate data without intervention, 2) higher spatial-and temporal-resolution data than that provided by the WSR-88D, 3) consistent and low-altitude information, and 4) more accurate information on precipitation type, size, intensity, and distribution.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 4, 2010

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