Storm-Induced Wind Patterns on the Sea from Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar

Storm-Induced Wind Patterns on the Sea from Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar The authors discuss the origin of a unique footprint on the sea induced by storm winds and rainfall as seen by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) from space. Two hypotheses are presented to explain the origin of an apparent wind shadow downwind of a storm cell. The first suggests that the cool air pool from the storm acts as an obstacle to divert the low-level easterly ambient winds and leaves a wind shadow on its downwind side. This theory is discarded because of the excessive storm lifetime needed to cause the long downstream shadow. The second hypothesis invokes the cool outflows from two preexisting storm cells such that their boundaries intersect obliquely leaving a triangular wedge of weaker winds and radar cross section (i.e., the shadow). A new precipitation cell is initiated at the point of intersection of the boundaries at the apex of the shadow, giving the illusion that this cell is the cause of the shadow. While the authors lack corroborative observations, this theory is consistent with prior evidence of the triggering of convective clouds and precipitation by intersecting cool air boundaries. The regular observation of such persistent cool air storm outflow boundaries both in satellite observations, and more recently in SAR imagery, suggests that such discontinuities are ubiquitous and serve to trigger new convection in the absence of large-scale forcing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Storm-Induced Wind Patterns on the Sea from Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/storm-induced-wind-patterns-on-the-sea-from-spaceborne-synthetic-3EVAlMto09
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1995)076<1585:SIWPOT>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors discuss the origin of a unique footprint on the sea induced by storm winds and rainfall as seen by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) from space. Two hypotheses are presented to explain the origin of an apparent wind shadow downwind of a storm cell. The first suggests that the cool air pool from the storm acts as an obstacle to divert the low-level easterly ambient winds and leaves a wind shadow on its downwind side. This theory is discarded because of the excessive storm lifetime needed to cause the long downstream shadow. The second hypothesis invokes the cool outflows from two preexisting storm cells such that their boundaries intersect obliquely leaving a triangular wedge of weaker winds and radar cross section (i.e., the shadow). A new precipitation cell is initiated at the point of intersection of the boundaries at the apex of the shadow, giving the illusion that this cell is the cause of the shadow. While the authors lack corroborative observations, this theory is consistent with prior evidence of the triggering of convective clouds and precipitation by intersecting cool air boundaries. The regular observation of such persistent cool air storm outflow boundaries both in satellite observations, and more recently in SAR imagery, suggests that such discontinuities are ubiquitous and serve to trigger new convection in the absence of large-scale forcing.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 7, 1995

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial