special news about our members

special news about our members special news about our members AMS Fellow Appointed as NSF Director of the Division of Atmospheric Sciences The National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced that Richard S. Greenfield has been appointed as the new director of the Division of Atmospheric Sciences. Greenfield joined the NSF in 1974 as program director for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP), in which he was instrumental in coordinating NSF support of academic participation in the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) in association with NOAA. He then directed participation in the Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) and Alpine Experiment (ALPEX) as the United States's focal point for each of these projects. In 1980 Greenfield was appointed the head of the Grant Programs Section, where his responsibilities included overseeing all of the Atmospheric Science Division's grant activities. He worked with UCAR to initiate the University Data (UNIDATA) Program, which provided weather data and interactive computer capability to more than 100 colleges and universities for research and education activities. Due to the expanding scope of the grant programs, the division was reorganized in 1988. Greenfield then assumed leadership of the Lower Atmospheric Research Section until his recent appointment. Greenfield received his Ph.D. in meteorology from New York University is 1966. He was a senior research scientist at the Travelers Research Center and at its successor, the Center for the Environment and Man in Hartford, Connecticut, from 1966 to 1974. Greenfield is a Fellow of the AMS. He has won several NSF awards, the most recent being a Senior Executive Service Performance Award in 1992. He was given the award for his efforts to coordinate the support for a research aircraft expedition to observe the atmospheric effects of the Kuwait oil fires following the Persian Gulf War. The Division of Atmospheric Sciences currently has an annual budget of about $125 million to support atmospheric research at universities, nonacademic institutions, and NCAR. The division supports about 50% of the basic atmospheric research funded by the federal government. Editor's note: The March 1968 Bulletin contained the minutes of the meeting of the Council on 27 25 VBBtS BOO October 1967. At the meeting, the Council had one of • its early elections to the grade of Fellow, selecting 24 individuals for that honor. It is hardly surprising that the list included a couple of former presidents of the Society, but it is striking that it also included seven individuals who would later become president and one who would become secretary-general of the World Meteorological Organization. The full list was as follows. David Atlas Werner A. Baum Alfred K. Blackadar Phil E. Church George P. Cressman Gordon E. Dunn Robert D. Fletcher Warren L. Godson David S. Johnson Christian E. Junge William W. Kellogg Helmut E. Landsberg Julius London James E. Miller Morris Neiburger Walter O. Roberts Vincent J. Schaefer Zdenek Sekera Percival A. Sheppard Joanne Simpson Bernard Vonnegut Helmut E. Weickmann Aksel C. Wiin-Nielson Hurd C. Willett Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 271. Bulletin American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-74.3.477a
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Abstract

special news about our members AMS Fellow Appointed as NSF Director of the Division of Atmospheric Sciences The National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced that Richard S. Greenfield has been appointed as the new director of the Division of Atmospheric Sciences. Greenfield joined the NSF in 1974 as program director for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP), in which he was instrumental in coordinating NSF support of academic participation in the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) in association with NOAA. He then directed participation in the Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) and Alpine Experiment (ALPEX) as the United States's focal point for each of these projects. In 1980 Greenfield was appointed the head of the Grant Programs Section, where his responsibilities included overseeing all of the Atmospheric Science Division's grant activities. He worked with UCAR to initiate the University Data (UNIDATA) Program, which provided weather data and interactive computer capability to more than 100 colleges and universities for research and education activities. Due to the expanding scope of the grant programs, the division was reorganized in 1988. Greenfield then assumed leadership of the Lower Atmospheric Research Section until his recent appointment. Greenfield received his Ph.D. in meteorology from New York University is 1966. He was a senior research scientist at the Travelers Research Center and at its successor, the Center for the Environment and Man in Hartford, Connecticut, from 1966 to 1974. Greenfield is a Fellow of the AMS. He has won several NSF awards, the most recent being a Senior Executive Service Performance Award in 1992. He was given the award for his efforts to coordinate the support for a research aircraft expedition to observe the atmospheric effects of the Kuwait oil fires following the Persian Gulf War. The Division of Atmospheric Sciences currently has an annual budget of about $125 million to support atmospheric research at universities, nonacademic institutions, and NCAR. The division supports about 50% of the basic atmospheric research funded by the federal government. Editor's note: The March 1968 Bulletin contained the minutes of the meeting of the Council on 27 25 VBBtS BOO October 1967. At the meeting, the Council had one of • its early elections to the grade of Fellow, selecting 24 individuals for that honor. It is hardly surprising that the list included a couple of former presidents of the Society, but it is striking that it also included seven individuals who would later become president and one who would become secretary-general of the World Meteorological Organization. The full list was as follows. David Atlas Werner A. Baum Alfred K. Blackadar Phil E. Church George P. Cressman Gordon E. Dunn Robert D. Fletcher Warren L. Godson David S. Johnson Christian E. Junge William W. Kellogg Helmut E. Landsberg Julius London James E. Miller Morris Neiburger Walter O. Roberts Vincent J. Schaefer Zdenek Sekera Percival A. Sheppard Joanne Simpson Bernard Vonnegut Helmut E. Weickmann Aksel C. Wiin-Nielson Hurd C. Willett Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 271. Bulletin American Meteorological Society

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1993

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