Snow-(N)AO teleconnection and its modulation by the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation

Snow-(N)AO teleconnection and its modulation by the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation AbstractThis study explores the wintertime extratropical atmospheric response to Siberian snow anomalies in fall, using observations and two distinct atmospheric general circulation models. The role of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation (QBO) in modulating this response is discussed by differentiating easterly and westerly QBO years. The remote influence of Siberian snow anomalies is found to be weak in the models, especially in the stratosphere where the “Holton-Tan” effect of the QBO dominates the simulated snow influence on the polar vortex. At the surface, discrepancies between composite analyses from observations and model results question the causal relationship between snow and the atmospheric circulation, in suggesting that the atmosphere might have driven snow anomalies rather than the other way around. When both forcings are combined, the simulations suggest destructive interference between the response to positive snow anomalies and easterly QBO (and vice versa), at odds with the hypothesis that the snow-(N)AO teleconnection in recent decades has been promoted by the QBO. Although model limitations in capturing the relationship exist, altogether our results suggest that the snow-(N)AO teleconnection may be a stochastic artifact rather than a genuine atmospheric response to snow cover variability. This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that climate models do not capture a robust and stationary snow-(N)AO relationship. It also highlights the need for extending observations and/or improving models to progress on this matter. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Climate American Meteorological Society

Snow-(N)AO teleconnection and its modulation by the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/snow-n-ao-teleconnection-and-its-modulation-by-the-quasi-biennal-HRTNUMRpt0
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0442
D.O.I.
10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0041.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis study explores the wintertime extratropical atmospheric response to Siberian snow anomalies in fall, using observations and two distinct atmospheric general circulation models. The role of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation (QBO) in modulating this response is discussed by differentiating easterly and westerly QBO years. The remote influence of Siberian snow anomalies is found to be weak in the models, especially in the stratosphere where the “Holton-Tan” effect of the QBO dominates the simulated snow influence on the polar vortex. At the surface, discrepancies between composite analyses from observations and model results question the causal relationship between snow and the atmospheric circulation, in suggesting that the atmosphere might have driven snow anomalies rather than the other way around. When both forcings are combined, the simulations suggest destructive interference between the response to positive snow anomalies and easterly QBO (and vice versa), at odds with the hypothesis that the snow-(N)AO teleconnection in recent decades has been promoted by the QBO. Although model limitations in capturing the relationship exist, altogether our results suggest that the snow-(N)AO teleconnection may be a stochastic artifact rather than a genuine atmospheric response to snow cover variability. This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that climate models do not capture a robust and stationary snow-(N)AO relationship. It also highlights the need for extending observations and/or improving models to progress on this matter.

Journal

Journal of ClimateAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 27, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off