Role of Finite-Amplitude Rossby Waves and Nonconservative Processes in Downward Migration of Extratropical Flow Anomalies

Role of Finite-Amplitude Rossby Waves and Nonconservative Processes in Downward Migration of... AbstractThere is growing evidence that stratospheric variability exerts a noticeable imprint on tropospheric weather and climate. Despite clear evidence of these impacts, the principal mechanism whereby stratospheric variability influences tropospheric circulation has remained elusive. Here, the authors introduce a novel approach, based on the theory of finite-amplitude wave activity, for quantifying the role of adiabatic and nonconservative effects on the mean flow that shape the downward coupling from the stratosphere to the troposphere during stratospheric vortex weakening (SVW) events. The advantage of using this theory is that eddy effects (at finite amplitude) on the mean flow can be more readily distinguished from nonconservative effects.The results show (in confirmation of previous work) that the downward migration of extratropical wind anomalies is largely attributable to dynamical adjustments induced by fluctuating finite-amplitude wave forcing. The nonconservative effects, on the other hand, contribute to maintaining the downward signals in the recovery stage within the stratosphere, hinting at the importance of mixing and diabatic heating. The analysis further indicates that variations in stratospheric finite-amplitude wave forcing are too weak to account for the attendant changes and shapes in the tropospheric flow. It is suggested that the indirect effect of tropospheric finite-amplitude wave activity through the residual displacements is needed to amplify and prolong the tropospheric wind responses over several weeks. The results also reveal that the local tropospheric wave activity over the North Pacific and North Atlantic sectors plays a significant role in shaping the high-latitude tropospheric wind response to SVW events. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences American Meteorological Society

Role of Finite-Amplitude Rossby Waves and Nonconservative Processes in Downward Migration of Extratropical Flow Anomalies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/role-of-finite-amplitude-rossby-waves-and-nonconservative-processes-in-WNWDiTqBCI
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0469
eISSN
1520-0469
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAS-D-17-0376.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThere is growing evidence that stratospheric variability exerts a noticeable imprint on tropospheric weather and climate. Despite clear evidence of these impacts, the principal mechanism whereby stratospheric variability influences tropospheric circulation has remained elusive. Here, the authors introduce a novel approach, based on the theory of finite-amplitude wave activity, for quantifying the role of adiabatic and nonconservative effects on the mean flow that shape the downward coupling from the stratosphere to the troposphere during stratospheric vortex weakening (SVW) events. The advantage of using this theory is that eddy effects (at finite amplitude) on the mean flow can be more readily distinguished from nonconservative effects.The results show (in confirmation of previous work) that the downward migration of extratropical wind anomalies is largely attributable to dynamical adjustments induced by fluctuating finite-amplitude wave forcing. The nonconservative effects, on the other hand, contribute to maintaining the downward signals in the recovery stage within the stratosphere, hinting at the importance of mixing and diabatic heating. The analysis further indicates that variations in stratospheric finite-amplitude wave forcing are too weak to account for the attendant changes and shapes in the tropospheric flow. It is suggested that the indirect effect of tropospheric finite-amplitude wave activity through the residual displacements is needed to amplify and prolong the tropospheric wind responses over several weeks. The results also reveal that the local tropospheric wave activity over the North Pacific and North Atlantic sectors plays a significant role in shaping the high-latitude tropospheric wind response to SVW events.

Journal

Journal of the Atmospheric SciencesAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 4, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off