Relationship between Tropical Cyclone Intensification and Cloud-top Outflow Revealed by Upper Tropospheric Atmospheric Motion Vectors

Relationship between Tropical Cyclone Intensification and Cloud-top Outflow Revealed by Upper... AbstractThe temporally dense geostationary satellite observations made possible by recent technological advances enable Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) to be derived suitable for capturing atmospheric flows even of mesoscale phenomena, for which in-situ data are scarce. Tropical cyclone (TC) outflows around the cloud top reflecting TC secondary circulation were computed by using AMVs derived from successive MTSAT imagery, and the relationship between TC intensification rate which was defined as the change of the best-track maximum sustained wind in the previous 24 h and the outflow was investigated for 44 TCs occurring during 2011–2014. During the TC intensification phase, temporal changes in the outflow were generally synchronous with changes in the cloud-top temperature of TC inner core convective clouds detected by MTSAT infrared band. It was noteworthy that the intensification rates of 66 % of the TCs peaked 0–36 h after outflow maximization, and the intensification rate for TCs with a maximum rate greater than 15 m s−1 day−1 peaked after the outflow maximum. Furthermore, TCs with a large intensification rate and latent heat release around the mid-level tended to have a large outflow during the intensification phase. A comparison of TCs with and without convective bursts (CBs) revealed that the correlation between outflow and the TC intensification rate was higher for TCs accompanied by CBs than for those without CBs, implying that a rapid deepening of inner-core convection is important for intensification of TC’s secondary circulation. The outflow tended to be most correlated with the TC intensification rate 0–6 h before. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

Relationship between Tropical Cyclone Intensification and Cloud-top Outflow Revealed by Upper Tropospheric Atmospheric Motion Vectors

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-17-0058.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe temporally dense geostationary satellite observations made possible by recent technological advances enable Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) to be derived suitable for capturing atmospheric flows even of mesoscale phenomena, for which in-situ data are scarce. Tropical cyclone (TC) outflows around the cloud top reflecting TC secondary circulation were computed by using AMVs derived from successive MTSAT imagery, and the relationship between TC intensification rate which was defined as the change of the best-track maximum sustained wind in the previous 24 h and the outflow was investigated for 44 TCs occurring during 2011–2014. During the TC intensification phase, temporal changes in the outflow were generally synchronous with changes in the cloud-top temperature of TC inner core convective clouds detected by MTSAT infrared band. It was noteworthy that the intensification rates of 66 % of the TCs peaked 0–36 h after outflow maximization, and the intensification rate for TCs with a maximum rate greater than 15 m s−1 day−1 peaked after the outflow maximum. Furthermore, TCs with a large intensification rate and latent heat release around the mid-level tended to have a large outflow during the intensification phase. A comparison of TCs with and without convective bursts (CBs) revealed that the correlation between outflow and the TC intensification rate was higher for TCs accompanied by CBs than for those without CBs, implying that a rapid deepening of inner-core convection is important for intensification of TC’s secondary circulation. The outflow tended to be most correlated with the TC intensification rate 0–6 h before.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 11, 2017

References

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