Publishers' Addresses

Publishers' Addresses rates and types. Further discussion of Doppler radar tion systems, and automated weather observing sys- systems continues in chapter 7. The WSR-88D, Ter- tems for visibility, cloud height, and precipitation in- minal Doppler Weather Radar, and ASR-9 (airport formation in the vicinity of airports. surveillance radar) are described, as are their merits for In chapter 9 integrated system approaches and the en route and terminal observations. Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) are de- Other sensors of aviation weather parameters are scribed. ITWS uses products from the Federal Avia- illustrated in chapter 8. Included are ground-based ra- tion Administration and the National Weather Service dar wind profilers, radio-acoustic sounding systems to develop alphanumeric and graphical displays as for aircraft icing potential, airborne wind shear detec- well as voice uplinks to aircraft and air traffic control- lers. Automatic detection and tracking of weather fea- tures based on pattern and signature recognition is discussed in chapter 10. Chapters 11 through 13, special topics, round out the book. Included are brief introductions to atmo- spheric turbulence detection by radar, lightning detec- tion and effects on aircraft systems and structures, and Publishers' Addresses polarization diversity radars (less attenuation and bet- ter delineation of precipitation types and quantity). In summary, the reviewer finds the book success- ful in its goal to tie together aviation weather phenom- American Institute of ena, surveillance systems, and information providers Aeronautics and Astronautics and users. Many references are included, some quite 1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Suite 500 recent and some old standards to cover the broad range Reston, VA 20191 of topics and readers' backgrounds. The reviewer would like to see more emphasis given to aircraft ic- Computational Mechanics ing detection and forecasting and also runway brak- 25 Bridge St., Billerica, MA 01821 ing action measurements as these constitute a number Telephone: 508-667-5841 of mishaps and accident potential. The book covers an important, ever-evolving topic Institution of Electrical Engineers as aviation and technology continue to expand. Indeed, Michael Faraday House during the period this review was undertaken, a long Six Hills Way, Stevenage stretch of nonfatal U.S. aviation operations ended as Herts. SGI 2AY, United Kingdom an aircraft allegedly attempted landing during a hail- storm in Little Rock, Arkansas. So the challenge for International Association of safer flight operations continues.—Barry S. Turkel. Hydrological Sciences Institute of Hydrology Barry S. Turkel holds a B.S. degree in meteorology Wallingford and an M.S. degree in aviation systems. He is em- OXIO 8BB, United Kingdom ployed as a flight superintendent in the Flight Con- trol Department at Delta Air Lines, Inc. • UNESCO Publishing 4611-F Assembly Drive Lanham, MD 20706 Telephone: 301-459-2255 The University of Chicago Press ty> 5801 South Ellis Chicago, IL 60637 y \ Telephone: 773-702-7700 Vol. 80, No. 9, September 7 999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Publishers' Addresses

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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.9.1924
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Abstract

rates and types. Further discussion of Doppler radar tion systems, and automated weather observing sys- systems continues in chapter 7. The WSR-88D, Ter- tems for visibility, cloud height, and precipitation in- minal Doppler Weather Radar, and ASR-9 (airport formation in the vicinity of airports. surveillance radar) are described, as are their merits for In chapter 9 integrated system approaches and the en route and terminal observations. Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) are de- Other sensors of aviation weather parameters are scribed. ITWS uses products from the Federal Avia- illustrated in chapter 8. Included are ground-based ra- tion Administration and the National Weather Service dar wind profilers, radio-acoustic sounding systems to develop alphanumeric and graphical displays as for aircraft icing potential, airborne wind shear detec- well as voice uplinks to aircraft and air traffic control- lers. Automatic detection and tracking of weather fea- tures based on pattern and signature recognition is discussed in chapter 10. Chapters 11 through 13, special topics, round out the book. Included are brief introductions to atmo- spheric turbulence detection by radar, lightning detec- tion and effects on aircraft systems and structures, and Publishers' Addresses polarization diversity radars (less attenuation and bet- ter delineation of precipitation types and quantity). In summary, the reviewer finds the book success- ful in its goal to tie together aviation weather phenom- American Institute of ena, surveillance systems, and information providers Aeronautics and Astronautics and users. Many references are included, some quite 1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Suite 500 recent and some old standards to cover the broad range Reston, VA 20191 of topics and readers' backgrounds. The reviewer would like to see more emphasis given to aircraft ic- Computational Mechanics ing detection and forecasting and also runway brak- 25 Bridge St., Billerica, MA 01821 ing action measurements as these constitute a number Telephone: 508-667-5841 of mishaps and accident potential. The book covers an important, ever-evolving topic Institution of Electrical Engineers as aviation and technology continue to expand. Indeed, Michael Faraday House during the period this review was undertaken, a long Six Hills Way, Stevenage stretch of nonfatal U.S. aviation operations ended as Herts. SGI 2AY, United Kingdom an aircraft allegedly attempted landing during a hail- storm in Little Rock, Arkansas. So the challenge for International Association of safer flight operations continues.—Barry S. Turkel. Hydrological Sciences Institute of Hydrology Barry S. Turkel holds a B.S. degree in meteorology Wallingford and an M.S. degree in aviation systems. He is em- OXIO 8BB, United Kingdom ployed as a flight superintendent in the Flight Con- trol Department at Delta Air Lines, Inc. • UNESCO Publishing 4611-F Assembly Drive Lanham, MD 20706 Telephone: 301-459-2255 The University of Chicago Press ty> 5801 South Ellis Chicago, IL 60637 y \ Telephone: 773-702-7700 Vol. 80, No. 9, September 7 999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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