PUBLISHERS' ADDRESSES

PUBLISHERS' ADDRESSES sphere and to refine the information already gained complishments by his students and colleagues, I ob- from the ground. During his tenure at JPL he made served the strong bonds between him and his students several additional discoveries including the discovery that revealed both affection and admiration for his of carbon monoxide on Mars and hydrogen halides on gentle way of dealing with them and for the inspira- Venus. In 1968, NASA recognized his many achieve- tion he gave them. His unpretentious, forthright man- ments by awarding him the "NASA Exceptional Sci- ner, integrity, and devotion to science were greatly entific Achievement Medal." admired by all his colleagues and students. The international environment of space exploration In 1978, Kaplan returned to government service at and the global perspective of earth observations put the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. He felt that Kaplan more and more in touch with international the new generation of powerful supercomputers could colleagues who visited him at JPL. Between 1964 and handle the more sophisticated radiative transfer codes 1969 he spent three sabbaticals as visiting professor that he had been working on. These codes, he con- at Oxford University, the University of Oslo, and the cluded, should improve the rapidly evolving numeri- University of Paris. Each time he returned to JPL he cal prediction models. Furthermore, he observed that brought with him new volumes of spectral data and such improved codes would also require more capable the names of a few postdoctoral students who followed observational data and to Kaplan that meant higher him later, some of whom are still at JPL now. In 1970 spectral resolution, better spectroscopy, and a broader he returned to the University of Chicago to teach and spectral coverage. These ideas about improved sound- to educate a new generation of scientists about the new ers found their way directly into the design of the tools of remote sensing, spectroscopy, atmospheric sounder of the future—the Atmospheric Infrared radiation, and their application to meteorology. Sev- Sounder, which will fly at the end of the year 2000 on eral years later, during a private celebration of his ac- NASA's Earth Observing System. Beowulf Publishing, Inc. 12635 Delman Lane, Pinesville, NC 28134; Telephone: 704-544-0919 Computational Mechanics 25 Bridge St., Billerica, MA 01821; Telephone: 978-667-5841 Iowa Institute for Hydraulic Research The University of Iowa, 404 Hydraulics Laboratory, Iowa City, IA 52242-1585 Telephone: 319-335-5239 Oxford University Press 198 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016; Telephone: 212-726-6000 Perseus Books 1 Jacob Way, Reading, MA 01867; Telephone: 781-944-3700 Springer-Verlag 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010; Telephone: 212-460-1500 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2321 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

PUBLISHERS' ADDRESSES

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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.11.2369
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Abstract

sphere and to refine the information already gained complishments by his students and colleagues, I ob- from the ground. During his tenure at JPL he made served the strong bonds between him and his students several additional discoveries including the discovery that revealed both affection and admiration for his of carbon monoxide on Mars and hydrogen halides on gentle way of dealing with them and for the inspira- Venus. In 1968, NASA recognized his many achieve- tion he gave them. His unpretentious, forthright man- ments by awarding him the "NASA Exceptional Sci- ner, integrity, and devotion to science were greatly entific Achievement Medal." admired by all his colleagues and students. The international environment of space exploration In 1978, Kaplan returned to government service at and the global perspective of earth observations put the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. He felt that Kaplan more and more in touch with international the new generation of powerful supercomputers could colleagues who visited him at JPL. Between 1964 and handle the more sophisticated radiative transfer codes 1969 he spent three sabbaticals as visiting professor that he had been working on. These codes, he con- at Oxford University, the University of Oslo, and the cluded, should improve the rapidly evolving numeri- University of Paris. Each time he returned to JPL he cal prediction models. Furthermore, he observed that brought with him new volumes of spectral data and such improved codes would also require more capable the names of a few postdoctoral students who followed observational data and to Kaplan that meant higher him later, some of whom are still at JPL now. In 1970 spectral resolution, better spectroscopy, and a broader he returned to the University of Chicago to teach and spectral coverage. These ideas about improved sound- to educate a new generation of scientists about the new ers found their way directly into the design of the tools of remote sensing, spectroscopy, atmospheric sounder of the future—the Atmospheric Infrared radiation, and their application to meteorology. Sev- Sounder, which will fly at the end of the year 2000 on eral years later, during a private celebration of his ac- NASA's Earth Observing System. Beowulf Publishing, Inc. 12635 Delman Lane, Pinesville, NC 28134; Telephone: 704-544-0919 Computational Mechanics 25 Bridge St., Billerica, MA 01821; Telephone: 978-667-5841 Iowa Institute for Hydraulic Research The University of Iowa, 404 Hydraulics Laboratory, Iowa City, IA 52242-1585 Telephone: 319-335-5239 Oxford University Press 198 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10016; Telephone: 212-726-6000 Perseus Books 1 Jacob Way, Reading, MA 01867; Telephone: 781-944-3700 Springer-Verlag 175 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10010; Telephone: 212-460-1500 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 2321

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1999

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