PUBLISHERS' ADDRESSES

PUBLISHERS' ADDRESSES is sorely lacking in this chapter is a basic discussion cesses that are intrinsic to the authors' arguments. of the biogeochemical cycles that are intrinsic to the Photosynthesis, nutrient cycling, and trophic dynam- climatic system. It is premature to discuss the green- ics are just a few of the fundamental processes that are house effect, which is essentially the result of human not incorporated into this chapter to any significant impacts on the carbon cycle, without first presenting the extent. Chapter 10, "Managing the Earth," summarizes cycling of carbon through the earth's spheres and its the authors' views of achieving a sustainable environ- various reservoirs. Chapter 4 completes the atmospheric ment in light of an expanding population. Improved theme by providing a comprehensive discussion of the editing would have caught the problem of particular physics and chemistry of acid deposition, environmen- plates not matching the appropriate chapter. tal consequences, and remediation techniques. This book, despite its high factual content, fails to Chapter 5 on water resources and pollution is too meet the objective of providing the student and instruc- ambitious in its attempt to cover both fresh- and salt- tor with the fundamental information they need to have water environments as well as natural aquatic pro- about environmental issues. Considering its relatively cesses and anthropogenic influences within these hefty price tag, I foresee this book filling a niche as a environments. The authors are remiss in failing to dis- reference source.—Stan L. Ulanski. cuss the fundamental physical and chemical proper- Stan Ulanski is a professor in the Department of ties of liquid water that make it unique when compared to other liquids. Chapter 6 covers advances in nuclear Geology and Environmental Studies at James Madi- technology as it pertains to the generation of nuclear son University energy and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Though the authors adequately address the pros and cons of the nuclear debate, I think the reader would be better served if the material on nuclear energy was incorporated into chapter 7 (energy issues, conven- tional fossil fuels, and conservation). Technically, the issue of nuclear missiles falls within the context of this chapter, but if the authors are inclined to include weap- ons as an environmental concern, then why not also Computational Mechanics incorporate biological and chemical weapons? 25 Bridge St., Billerica, MA 01821 Telephone: 781-667-5841 Chapter 9, "Natural Hazards," suffers primarily from a lack of in-depth explanation of the physical Kluwer Academic Publishers phenomena in question. For example, the authors do 101 Philip Dr., Norwell, MA 02061 not incorporate the concept of an open-wave midlati- Telephone: 617-871-6600 tude cyclone in the formation of a tornado or the role of the upper-level circulation in the genesis of a hur- Plenum Publishing ricane. There is also inconsistency with regard to dis- 233 Spring St., New York, NY 10013 cussing these phenomena. On page 332, the authors Telephone: 800-221-9369 state, "There are three main hazards associated with thunderstorms: torrential rain, hailstorms, and light- Routledge ning." Previously, on page 328, the authors state, "Tor- 29 W. 35 St., New York, NY 10001 nadoe s are usually associated with severe Telephone: 212-244-3336 thunderstorms." The authors, as in previous chapters, include a prodigious number of statistical tables and Science Edition graphical time series, but there is a dearth of illustra- Hechelstrasse 8, D-28777 Bremen, Germany tions showing the formation and genesis of the phe- Telephone: unavailable nomena in question. In chapter 9, "Human Impacts on the Earth's Surface," the authors cover the gamut of John Wiley & Sons environmental problems (deforestation, soil erosion, 605 Third Ave., New York, NY 10158 overfishing, mineral extraction, hazardous waste) af- Telephone: 212-850-6000 fecting the terrestrial and aquatic realms. The reader is still left with a void with regard to the natural pro- Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 105 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

PUBLISHERS' ADDRESSES

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Abstract

is sorely lacking in this chapter is a basic discussion cesses that are intrinsic to the authors' arguments. of the biogeochemical cycles that are intrinsic to the Photosynthesis, nutrient cycling, and trophic dynam- climatic system. It is premature to discuss the green- ics are just a few of the fundamental processes that are house effect, which is essentially the result of human not incorporated into this chapter to any significant impacts on the carbon cycle, without first presenting the extent. Chapter 10, "Managing the Earth," summarizes cycling of carbon through the earth's spheres and its the authors' views of achieving a sustainable environ- various reservoirs. Chapter 4 completes the atmospheric ment in light of an expanding population. Improved theme by providing a comprehensive discussion of the editing would have caught the problem of particular physics and chemistry of acid deposition, environmen- plates not matching the appropriate chapter. tal consequences, and remediation techniques. This book, despite its high factual content, fails to Chapter 5 on water resources and pollution is too meet the objective of providing the student and instruc- ambitious in its attempt to cover both fresh- and salt- tor with the fundamental information they need to have water environments as well as natural aquatic pro- about environmental issues. Considering its relatively cesses and anthropogenic influences within these hefty price tag, I foresee this book filling a niche as a environments. The authors are remiss in failing to dis- reference source.—Stan L. Ulanski. cuss the fundamental physical and chemical proper- Stan Ulanski is a professor in the Department of ties of liquid water that make it unique when compared to other liquids. Chapter 6 covers advances in nuclear Geology and Environmental Studies at James Madi- technology as it pertains to the generation of nuclear son University energy and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Though the authors adequately address the pros and cons of the nuclear debate, I think the reader would be better served if the material on nuclear energy was incorporated into chapter 7 (energy issues, conven- tional fossil fuels, and conservation). Technically, the issue of nuclear missiles falls within the context of this chapter, but if the authors are inclined to include weap- ons as an environmental concern, then why not also Computational Mechanics incorporate biological and chemical weapons? 25 Bridge St., Billerica, MA 01821 Telephone: 781-667-5841 Chapter 9, "Natural Hazards," suffers primarily from a lack of in-depth explanation of the physical Kluwer Academic Publishers phenomena in question. For example, the authors do 101 Philip Dr., Norwell, MA 02061 not incorporate the concept of an open-wave midlati- Telephone: 617-871-6600 tude cyclone in the formation of a tornado or the role of the upper-level circulation in the genesis of a hur- Plenum Publishing ricane. There is also inconsistency with regard to dis- 233 Spring St., New York, NY 10013 cussing these phenomena. On page 332, the authors Telephone: 800-221-9369 state, "There are three main hazards associated with thunderstorms: torrential rain, hailstorms, and light- Routledge ning." Previously, on page 328, the authors state, "Tor- 29 W. 35 St., New York, NY 10001 nadoe s are usually associated with severe Telephone: 212-244-3336 thunderstorms." The authors, as in previous chapters, include a prodigious number of statistical tables and Science Edition graphical time series, but there is a dearth of illustra- Hechelstrasse 8, D-28777 Bremen, Germany tions showing the formation and genesis of the phe- Telephone: unavailable nomena in question. In chapter 9, "Human Impacts on the Earth's Surface," the authors cover the gamut of John Wiley & Sons environmental problems (deforestation, soil erosion, 605 Third Ave., New York, NY 10158 overfishing, mineral extraction, hazardous waste) af- Telephone: 212-850-6000 fecting the terrestrial and aquatic realms. The reader is still left with a void with regard to the natural pro- Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 105

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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