On the need to modify the sea-surface roughness formulation over shallow waters

On the need to modify the sea-surface roughness formulation over shallow waters AbstractThe wind stress formulation in an atmospheric model over shallow waters is investigated using year-long observations of the wind profile within the first 100 m of the atmosphere and mesoscale simulations. The model experiments use a range of planetary boundary layer parameterizations in order to quantify the uncertainty related to the turbulent closure assumptions, and thus isolate the dominant influence of the surface roughness formulation. Results indicate that a positive wind speed bias exists when common open ocean formulations for roughness is adopted for a region with a water depth of 30 m. Imposing a wind stress formulation consistent with previous shallow-water estimates is necessary to reconcile model windspeeds with observations, providing modeling evidence supporting the increase of surface drag over shallow waters. The possibility of including water depth in the parameterization of roughness length is examined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

On the need to modify the sea-surface roughness formulation over shallow waters

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-17-0137.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe wind stress formulation in an atmospheric model over shallow waters is investigated using year-long observations of the wind profile within the first 100 m of the atmosphere and mesoscale simulations. The model experiments use a range of planetary boundary layer parameterizations in order to quantify the uncertainty related to the turbulent closure assumptions, and thus isolate the dominant influence of the surface roughness formulation. Results indicate that a positive wind speed bias exists when common open ocean formulations for roughness is adopted for a region with a water depth of 30 m. Imposing a wind stress formulation consistent with previous shallow-water estimates is necessary to reconcile model windspeeds with observations, providing modeling evidence supporting the increase of surface drag over shallow waters. The possibility of including water depth in the parameterization of roughness length is examined.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 15, 2018

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