On Solar Energy Disposition: A Perspective from Observation and Modeling

On Solar Energy Disposition: A Perspective from Observation and Modeling Solar energy disposition (SED) concerns the amount of solar radiation reflected to space, absorbed in the atmosphere, and absorbed at the surface. The state of knowledge on SED is examined by comparing eight datasets from surface and satellite observation and modeling by general circulation models. The discrepancies among these contemporary estimates of SED are so large that wisdom on conventional SED is wanting. Thanks to satellite observations, the earth's radiation budget (ERB) at the top of the atmosphere is reasonably well known. Current GCMs manage to reproduce a reasonable global and annual mean ERB, but often fail to simulate the variations in ERB associated with certain cloud regimes such as tropical convection and storm tracks. In comparison to ERB, knowledge of the surface radiation budget (SRB) and the atmospheric radiation budget (ARB) is still rather poor, owing to the inherent problems in both in situ observations and remote sensing. The major shortcoming of in situ observations lies in insufficient sampling, while the remote sensing techniques suffer from lack of information on some variables affecting the radiative transfer process, and dependence, directly or indirectly, on radiative transfer models. Nevertheless, satellite-based SRB products agree fairly well overall with ground-based observations. GCM-simulated SRBs and ARBs are not only subject to large regional uncertainties associated with clouds, but also to systematic errors of the order of 25 W m2, due possibly to the neglect of aerosol and/or inaccurate computation of water vapor absorption. Analyses of various datasets suggest that the SED based on ERBE satellite data appears to be more reliable, indicating 30 reflection to space, 24 absorption in the atmosphere, and 46 absorption at the surface. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

On Solar Energy Disposition: A Perspective from Observation and Modeling

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/on-solar-energy-disposition-a-perspective-from-observation-and-Fe86U4hyg4
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477(1997)078<0053:OSEDAP>2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Solar energy disposition (SED) concerns the amount of solar radiation reflected to space, absorbed in the atmosphere, and absorbed at the surface. The state of knowledge on SED is examined by comparing eight datasets from surface and satellite observation and modeling by general circulation models. The discrepancies among these contemporary estimates of SED are so large that wisdom on conventional SED is wanting. Thanks to satellite observations, the earth's radiation budget (ERB) at the top of the atmosphere is reasonably well known. Current GCMs manage to reproduce a reasonable global and annual mean ERB, but often fail to simulate the variations in ERB associated with certain cloud regimes such as tropical convection and storm tracks. In comparison to ERB, knowledge of the surface radiation budget (SRB) and the atmospheric radiation budget (ARB) is still rather poor, owing to the inherent problems in both in situ observations and remote sensing. The major shortcoming of in situ observations lies in insufficient sampling, while the remote sensing techniques suffer from lack of information on some variables affecting the radiative transfer process, and dependence, directly or indirectly, on radiative transfer models. Nevertheless, satellite-based SRB products agree fairly well overall with ground-based observations. GCM-simulated SRBs and ARBs are not only subject to large regional uncertainties associated with clouds, but also to systematic errors of the order of 25 W m2, due possibly to the neglect of aerosol and/or inaccurate computation of water vapor absorption. Analyses of various datasets suggest that the SED based on ERBE satellite data appears to be more reliable, indicating 30 reflection to space, 24 absorption in the atmosphere, and 46 absorption at the surface.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off