Observed Relationships between Cloud Vertical Structure and Convective Aggregation over Tropical Ocean

Observed Relationships between Cloud Vertical Structure and Convective Aggregation over Tropical... AbstractUsing the satellite-infrared-based Simple Convective Aggregation Index (SCAI) to determine the degree of aggregation, 5 years of CloudSat–CALIPSO cloud profiles are composited at a spatial scale of 10 degrees to study the relationship between cloud vertical structure and aggregation. For a given large-scale vertical motion and domain-averaged precipitation rate, there is a large decrease in anvil cloud (and in cloudiness as a whole) and an increase in clear sky and low cloud as aggregation increases. The changes in thick anvil cloud are proportional to the changes in total areal cover of brightness temperatures below 240 K [cold cloud area (CCA)], which is negatively correlated with SCAI. Optically thin anvil cover decreases significantly when aggregation increases, even for a fixed CCA, supporting previous findings of a higher precipitation efficiency for aggregated convection. Cirrus, congestus, and midlevel clouds do not display a consistent relationship with the degree of aggregation. Lidar-observed low-level cloud cover (where the lidar is not attenuated) is presented herein as the best estimate of the true low-level cloud cover, and it is shown that it increases as aggregation increases. Qualitatively, the relationships between cloud distribution and SCAI do not change with sea surface temperature, while cirrus clouds are more abundant and low-level clouds less at higher sea surface temperatures. For the observed regimes, the vertical cloud profile varies more evidently with SCAI than with mean precipitation rate. These results confirm that convective scenes with similar vertical motion and rainfall can be associated with vastly different cloudiness (both high and low cloud) and humidity depending on the degree of convective aggregation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Climate American Meteorological Society

Observed Relationships between Cloud Vertical Structure and Convective Aggregation over Tropical Ocean

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/observed-relationships-between-cloud-vertical-structure-and-convective-EM66y4Z5nQ
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0442
eISSN
1520-0442
D.O.I.
10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0125.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractUsing the satellite-infrared-based Simple Convective Aggregation Index (SCAI) to determine the degree of aggregation, 5 years of CloudSat–CALIPSO cloud profiles are composited at a spatial scale of 10 degrees to study the relationship between cloud vertical structure and aggregation. For a given large-scale vertical motion and domain-averaged precipitation rate, there is a large decrease in anvil cloud (and in cloudiness as a whole) and an increase in clear sky and low cloud as aggregation increases. The changes in thick anvil cloud are proportional to the changes in total areal cover of brightness temperatures below 240 K [cold cloud area (CCA)], which is negatively correlated with SCAI. Optically thin anvil cover decreases significantly when aggregation increases, even for a fixed CCA, supporting previous findings of a higher precipitation efficiency for aggregated convection. Cirrus, congestus, and midlevel clouds do not display a consistent relationship with the degree of aggregation. Lidar-observed low-level cloud cover (where the lidar is not attenuated) is presented herein as the best estimate of the true low-level cloud cover, and it is shown that it increases as aggregation increases. Qualitatively, the relationships between cloud distribution and SCAI do not change with sea surface temperature, while cirrus clouds are more abundant and low-level clouds less at higher sea surface temperatures. For the observed regimes, the vertical cloud profile varies more evidently with SCAI than with mean precipitation rate. These results confirm that convective scenes with similar vertical motion and rainfall can be associated with vastly different cloudiness (both high and low cloud) and humidity depending on the degree of convective aggregation.

Journal

Journal of ClimateAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 9, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off