Observational Constraint for Precipitation in Extratropical Cyclones: sensitivity to data sources

Observational Constraint for Precipitation in Extratropical Cyclones: sensitivity to data sources AbstractUsing a database of extratropical cyclone locations, and cyclone-centered compositing, the distribution of precipitation frequency and rate in oceanic extratropical cyclones is analyzed using satellite-derived datasets. The distribution of precipitation rates retrieved using two new datasets, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) radar-microwave radiometer combined (GPM-CMB) and the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products, are compared to CloudSat and the differences are discussed. For reference, the composites of AMSR-E, GPCP and two reanalyses are also examined. Cyclone-centered precipitation rates are found to be the largest with the IMERG and CloudSat datasets and lowest with GPM-CMB. A series of tests are conducted to determine the role of swath width and location, and sampling frequency, season and epoch. In all cases, these impacts are less than ~0.14 mm/hr at 50 km resolution. Larger differences in the composites are related to retrieval biases, such as ground-clutter contamination in GPM-CMB and radar saturation in CloudSat. Overall the IMERG product reports precipitation more often, with larger precipitation rates at the center of the cyclones, in high precipitable water (PW) conditions. The CloudSat product tends to report more precipitation in dry or moderate PW conditions. The GPM-CMB product tends to systematically report lower precipitation rates than the other two datasets. This inter-comparison comparison provides: (a) modelers with an observational uncertainty and range (0.21 to 0.36 mm/hr near the cyclone centers) when using composites of precipitation for model evaluation, and (b) retrieval algorithm developers with categorical analysis of the sensitivity of the products to PW. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

Observational Constraint for Precipitation in Extratropical Cyclones: sensitivity to data sources

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/observational-constraint-for-precipitation-in-extratropical-cyclones-haRSOgfbXp
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-17-0289.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractUsing a database of extratropical cyclone locations, and cyclone-centered compositing, the distribution of precipitation frequency and rate in oceanic extratropical cyclones is analyzed using satellite-derived datasets. The distribution of precipitation rates retrieved using two new datasets, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) radar-microwave radiometer combined (GPM-CMB) and the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products, are compared to CloudSat and the differences are discussed. For reference, the composites of AMSR-E, GPCP and two reanalyses are also examined. Cyclone-centered precipitation rates are found to be the largest with the IMERG and CloudSat datasets and lowest with GPM-CMB. A series of tests are conducted to determine the role of swath width and location, and sampling frequency, season and epoch. In all cases, these impacts are less than ~0.14 mm/hr at 50 km resolution. Larger differences in the composites are related to retrieval biases, such as ground-clutter contamination in GPM-CMB and radar saturation in CloudSat. Overall the IMERG product reports precipitation more often, with larger precipitation rates at the center of the cyclones, in high precipitable water (PW) conditions. The CloudSat product tends to report more precipitation in dry or moderate PW conditions. The GPM-CMB product tends to systematically report lower precipitation rates than the other two datasets. This inter-comparison comparison provides: (a) modelers with an observational uncertainty and range (0.21 to 0.36 mm/hr near the cyclone centers) when using composites of precipitation for model evaluation, and (b) retrieval algorithm developers with categorical analysis of the sensitivity of the products to PW.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 6, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial