NOWCAST

NOWCAST NEWS AND NOTES HO T TOWERS, STRONGER HURRICANES They are called hurri- canes in the Atlantic, typhoons in the West Pacific, and tropical cy- clones worldwide, but wherever these storms roam, the forces that de- termine their severity now are a little less mys- terious. NASA scien- tists, using data from the Tropical Rainfall Mea- suring Mission (TRMM) satellite, have found "hot tower" clouds are asso- ciated with tropical cy- clone intensification. Owen Kelley and Hurrican e Bonnie's cumulonimbus storm clouds towere d I I miles (18 km ) above John Stout of NASA's th e eye of th e storm. The height in this image is exaggerated for clarity, and col- Goddard Space Flight ors correspond to surface precipitation from blue (light) to red (heavy). Center, Greenbelt, Mary- land, and George Mason University define a "hot tower" as three deaths, according to NOAA's To achieve their goal, Kelley and a rain cloud that reaches at least to National Hurricane Center. Stout needed to compile special the top of the troposphere, the Kelley says, "The motivation for kinds of global statistics on the oc- lowest layer of the atmosphere. It this new research is that it is not currence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-85.3.327
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NEWS AND NOTES HO T TOWERS, STRONGER HURRICANES They are called hurri- canes in the Atlantic, typhoons in the West Pacific, and tropical cy- clones worldwide, but wherever these storms roam, the forces that de- termine their severity now are a little less mys- terious. NASA scien- tists, using data from the Tropical Rainfall Mea- suring Mission (TRMM) satellite, have found "hot tower" clouds are asso- ciated with tropical cy- clone intensification. Owen Kelley and Hurrican e Bonnie's cumulonimbus storm clouds towere d I I miles (18 km ) above John Stout of NASA's th e eye of th e storm. The height in this image is exaggerated for clarity, and col- Goddard Space Flight ors correspond to surface precipitation from blue (light) to red (heavy). Center, Greenbelt, Mary- land, and George Mason University define a "hot tower" as three deaths, according to NOAA's To achieve their goal, Kelley and a rain cloud that reaches at least to National Hurricane Center. Stout needed to compile special the top of the troposphere, the Kelley says, "The motivation for kinds of global statistics on the oc- lowest layer of the atmosphere. It this new research is that it is not currence

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 2004

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