NOWCAST

NOWCAST Nearly 20 years of satellite observations of net primary productivity reveal the seasonal and yearly cycles of Earth's vegetation. In this figure, the dominant theme is the shift in productivity (shades of green) between the North- . Hidden within this dominant cycle are more subtle ern and Southern Hemisphere over the course of a year vegetation patterns: a decrease in productivity at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991, as well as global-scale decreases in productivity during the El Nino events of 1982/83, 1987/88, and 1997/98. GREENIN G THE WORL D WITH zation and forest regrowth," says plant growth, but focused instead GLOBA L WARMING Ramakrishna Nemani, a lead sci- on the impact of changin g weather While global climate changes con- entist of th e study, which was pub- on plant growth. Coauthor Charles lished in the journal Science. Keeling, of Scripps Institution of tinue to concern scientists world- Oceanography in La Jolla, Califor- wide, plants couldn't be happier. Th e years 1980 to 2000 were two of the warmest decades on nia, says it is unclear if th e weather Climate changes of the last 20 changes are part of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-84.8.987
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nearly 20 years of satellite observations of net primary productivity reveal the seasonal and yearly cycles of Earth's vegetation. In this figure, the dominant theme is the shift in productivity (shades of green) between the North- . Hidden within this dominant cycle are more subtle ern and Southern Hemisphere over the course of a year vegetation patterns: a decrease in productivity at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991, as well as global-scale decreases in productivity during the El Nino events of 1982/83, 1987/88, and 1997/98. GREENIN G THE WORL D WITH zation and forest regrowth," says plant growth, but focused instead GLOBA L WARMING Ramakrishna Nemani, a lead sci- on the impact of changin g weather While global climate changes con- entist of th e study, which was pub- on plant growth. Coauthor Charles lished in the journal Science. Keeling, of Scripps Institution of tinue to concern scientists world- Oceanography in La Jolla, Califor- wide, plants couldn't be happier. Th e years 1980 to 2000 were two of the warmest decades on nia, says it is unclear if th e weather Climate changes of the last 20 changes are part of

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 1, 2003

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