new publications

new publications cepts, and environmental consequences. There are numerous and appropriate illustrations throughout the book. In addition, several vignettes are presented for historical prospective and enrichment. The subject is The Tornado: Its Structure, Dynamics, Pre- presented in seven short chapters, with each chapter diction, and Hazards [C. Church, D. Burgess, concentrating on a significant concept. New and im- C. Doswell, and R. Davies-Jones, Eds., 1993, portant terminology is printed in large bold letters. This 637 pp., $68.00 (AMS members); $85.00 (non- terminology is also presented in a comprehensive members), hardbound, American Geophysical glossary at the end of the book. Union, ISBN 0-87590-038-0]. The papers con- Of all the topics presented, those dealing with tained within this book document the advances of porosity and permeability are in need of clarification. In tornado research since the symposium on torna- this chapter, both the text and pictures indicate that does held at Texas Technological University in rocks such as sandstone are replete with spaces. A Lubbock, Texas, in 1976. Most of the papers, 53 photomicrograph is presented to indicate the spaces. in all, are based on work presented at the Third Actually, the area between the sand grains is a ce- Tornado Symposium held in Norman, Oklahoma, menting matrix that can retain water and permit it to 2- 5 April 1991. Sections address theory and migrate slowly through the rock. The impression given modeling, observational studies and natural phe- by the authors is that one could actually observe nomena, laboratory experiments, practical as- "holes" in these rocks, thus supporting their discussion pects of tornadoes (natural hazards, building of permeability. design, risk assessment, damage survey, and The presentation of material is very intensive with mitigation), and tornado forecasting techniques. terminology and concepts; this is the major reason An edited transcript of the discussion period that that it was identified as pertaining to interested stu- followed each session at the symposium ap- dents in sixth grade or higher. Thus, it is somewhat pears at the end of each section. condescending to refer to stored groundwater as "water in hiding." However, neither of the criticisms mentioned should dissuade the reading of this fine effort. On the contrary, one prime reason for including this text in your library is the adroit manner in which the authors address the conflict between the activities of VIZ MFG RADIOSONDES humans and the fragility of nature. Environmental awareness is a theme woven throughout each chap- "Acculok " = ter. Conservation, awareness, and the requirement to balance the needs of society with those of nature are • VIS Part Number: 1392-520 evident and fairly discussed. • NOAA/National Weather Service In summary, the authors' efforts provide our chil- NSN: 6660-01-103-9121 dren with a significant text on the topic of groundwater. • Frequency channel: 1680 MHz Their excellent research and communication skills • Transmission range: -90/5 0 deg.C, 10/100Pct. encourage one to seek out their other efforts in the • Pre-basedlined temperature and humidity series Our Endangered Planet.—Thomas C. Arnold. sensors • Pressure transducer Thomas C. Arnold is a teacher of the earth sciences • New in original VIZ pack, complete with battery in State College, Pennsylvania. He is an Atmospheric • Quantity discounts Education Research Agent (AERA) with the education division of AMS. ALSO: WEATHER RADARS • IFF SYSTEMS RAWIN SETS .SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RADAR COMPUTERS MARKARIAN BROS & ASSOCIATES • • • P.O. Box 11787 Fresno, California 93775 U.S.A. (209) 868-3548 FAX: (209) 486-3050 Bulletiri of the American Meteorological Society 455 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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American Meteorological Society
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10.1175/1520-0477-75.3.455
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Abstract

cepts, and environmental consequences. There are numerous and appropriate illustrations throughout the book. In addition, several vignettes are presented for historical prospective and enrichment. The subject is The Tornado: Its Structure, Dynamics, Pre- presented in seven short chapters, with each chapter diction, and Hazards [C. Church, D. Burgess, concentrating on a significant concept. New and im- C. Doswell, and R. Davies-Jones, Eds., 1993, portant terminology is printed in large bold letters. This 637 pp., $68.00 (AMS members); $85.00 (non- terminology is also presented in a comprehensive members), hardbound, American Geophysical glossary at the end of the book. Union, ISBN 0-87590-038-0]. The papers con- Of all the topics presented, those dealing with tained within this book document the advances of porosity and permeability are in need of clarification. In tornado research since the symposium on torna- this chapter, both the text and pictures indicate that does held at Texas Technological University in rocks such as sandstone are replete with spaces. A Lubbock, Texas, in 1976. Most of the papers, 53 photomicrograph is presented to indicate the spaces. in all, are based on work presented at the Third Actually, the area between the sand grains is a ce- Tornado Symposium held in Norman, Oklahoma, menting matrix that can retain water and permit it to 2- 5 April 1991. Sections address theory and migrate slowly through the rock. The impression given modeling, observational studies and natural phe- by the authors is that one could actually observe nomena, laboratory experiments, practical as- "holes" in these rocks, thus supporting their discussion pects of tornadoes (natural hazards, building of permeability. design, risk assessment, damage survey, and The presentation of material is very intensive with mitigation), and tornado forecasting techniques. terminology and concepts; this is the major reason An edited transcript of the discussion period that that it was identified as pertaining to interested stu- followed each session at the symposium ap- dents in sixth grade or higher. Thus, it is somewhat pears at the end of each section. condescending to refer to stored groundwater as "water in hiding." However, neither of the criticisms mentioned should dissuade the reading of this fine effort. On the contrary, one prime reason for including this text in your library is the adroit manner in which the authors address the conflict between the activities of VIZ MFG RADIOSONDES humans and the fragility of nature. Environmental awareness is a theme woven throughout each chap- "Acculok " = ter. Conservation, awareness, and the requirement to balance the needs of society with those of nature are • VIS Part Number: 1392-520 evident and fairly discussed. • NOAA/National Weather Service In summary, the authors' efforts provide our chil- NSN: 6660-01-103-9121 dren with a significant text on the topic of groundwater. • Frequency channel: 1680 MHz Their excellent research and communication skills • Transmission range: -90/5 0 deg.C, 10/100Pct. encourage one to seek out their other efforts in the • Pre-basedlined temperature and humidity series Our Endangered Planet.—Thomas C. Arnold. sensors • Pressure transducer Thomas C. Arnold is a teacher of the earth sciences • New in original VIZ pack, complete with battery in State College, Pennsylvania. He is an Atmospheric • Quantity discounts Education Research Agent (AERA) with the education division of AMS. ALSO: WEATHER RADARS • IFF SYSTEMS RAWIN SETS .SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RADAR COMPUTERS MARKARIAN BROS & ASSOCIATES • • • P.O. Box 11787 Fresno, California 93775 U.S.A. (209) 868-3548 FAX: (209) 486-3050 Bulletiri of the American Meteorological Society 455

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1994

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