New CCMs/Seals of Approval

New CCMs/Seals of Approval Centra l Louisiana ceptable for analysis because temperature and pre- Members gathered on 9 February 1995 at the cipitation factors become tangled and difficult to dis- campus of Louisiana State University for their monthly cern. meeting. Jim Sweeney, meteorologist intern, NWS, A question-and-answer session on a wide variety of Baton Rouge, was the guest speaker. Sweeney's subjects, such as El Nino, followed Michaelsen's topic was entitled "Isentropic Analysis: Its Applications presentation. Michaelsen commented that the current in Meteorology and Climatology." year appears to be a fairly mature El Nino, and that there appears to be more long-term warming of the Siouxlan d Weather MINDS Pacific equatorial oceans. This could lead to more wet years in the future since most of our extreme wet years AMS Council approved the organization of a new tend to associate with this phenomenon.—Phil Mann. chapter, the Siouxland Weather MINDS in January 1995. The chapter is located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Anyone in the Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and Dakotas areas interested in joining the chapter should contact Art Umland, P.O. Box 90002, Sioux Falls, SD 57105-9060. Sant a Barbara/Ventura Certified Consulting Meteorologists Dennis Gibbs, chapter secretary, began the 19 (Listed by Certificate Number) January 1995 meeting by welcoming the 23 people in attendance. Gibbs gave a precipitation update on the 24-hour and monthly records for the Santa Barbara 5H3 James &. Wieler 1995 area. Tom Johnston, chapter treasurer, gave a pre- 5HH Russell 5. Eirbes 1995 cipitation contest update. He stated that there were 5H5 Robert A l Rauber 1995 several candidates for the contest victor as there were 5% Michael P. Cavanaucjh 1995 many guesses above 20 inches. 5tl Vincent R. Scheetz 1995 Gary Ryan of the Santa Maria NWS gave a current 5% Calvin C. Naecjelin 1995 synoptic map discussion. At the time, two storms were lined up to come into the South Coast but Ryan emphasized that it appeared that these episodes should not entrain subtropical moisture, therefore, not producing rainfall amounts similar to the event on 10 Television Seals of Approval January. (Listed by Certificate Number) Joel Michaelsen, professor of climatology and meteorology and chair of the Geography Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, gave a presentation on dendrochronology: the study of tree- m Arch Kennedy 1995 ring analysis. Michaelsen made several points during 81 9 Robert A l Alarciano 1995 his presentation, which included the following. 1) The 830 John Scalzi 1995 average precipitation in the Southwest has not changed 831 Steve Adamson 1995 much over the last 400 years, which suggests that if 832 Neal Barton Jr. 1995 changes are occurring they are at a slow pace. 2) 833 Peter L. Bouchard II 1995 Although dendrochronology is one of the most accu- 83H Christopher Al. Farrell 1995 rate proxy records for reconstructing rainfall, it is by no 835 Craig W. Moeller 1995 means as accurate as written precipitation records. 83G Jeff Kirk 1995 Specifically, major flooding events are not likely to be 831 Kevin P. Lemanowicz 1995 recorded. 3) In the last century, wet years have been more common than in the previous 300 years, while extremely dry years have been less common. 4) The Big Cone Spruce tree seems to be the best tree for -Radio Seals of Approval analysis since it develops distinct growth rings based (Listed by Certificate Number) solely on precipitation as it usually thrives on steep slopes with shallow soil horizons and does not con- sume significant groundwater like the Valley Oak trees. 5) High elevation trees are generally less ac- 753 Michael S. LaPoint 1995 40 4 Vol. 76, No. 2, February 1995 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

New CCMs/Seals of Approval

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ams/new-ccms-seals-of-approval-ha0369i0Mp
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-76.3.404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Centra l Louisiana ceptable for analysis because temperature and pre- Members gathered on 9 February 1995 at the cipitation factors become tangled and difficult to dis- campus of Louisiana State University for their monthly cern. meeting. Jim Sweeney, meteorologist intern, NWS, A question-and-answer session on a wide variety of Baton Rouge, was the guest speaker. Sweeney's subjects, such as El Nino, followed Michaelsen's topic was entitled "Isentropic Analysis: Its Applications presentation. Michaelsen commented that the current in Meteorology and Climatology." year appears to be a fairly mature El Nino, and that there appears to be more long-term warming of the Siouxlan d Weather MINDS Pacific equatorial oceans. This could lead to more wet years in the future since most of our extreme wet years AMS Council approved the organization of a new tend to associate with this phenomenon.—Phil Mann. chapter, the Siouxland Weather MINDS in January 1995. The chapter is located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Anyone in the Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and Dakotas areas interested in joining the chapter should contact Art Umland, P.O. Box 90002, Sioux Falls, SD 57105-9060. Sant a Barbara/Ventura Certified Consulting Meteorologists Dennis Gibbs, chapter secretary, began the 19 (Listed by Certificate Number) January 1995 meeting by welcoming the 23 people in attendance. Gibbs gave a precipitation update on the 24-hour and monthly records for the Santa Barbara 5H3 James &. Wieler 1995 area. Tom Johnston, chapter treasurer, gave a pre- 5HH Russell 5. Eirbes 1995 cipitation contest update. He stated that there were 5H5 Robert A l Rauber 1995 several candidates for the contest victor as there were 5% Michael P. Cavanaucjh 1995 many guesses above 20 inches. 5tl Vincent R. Scheetz 1995 Gary Ryan of the Santa Maria NWS gave a current 5% Calvin C. Naecjelin 1995 synoptic map discussion. At the time, two storms were lined up to come into the South Coast but Ryan emphasized that it appeared that these episodes should not entrain subtropical moisture, therefore, not producing rainfall amounts similar to the event on 10 Television Seals of Approval January. (Listed by Certificate Number) Joel Michaelsen, professor of climatology and meteorology and chair of the Geography Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, gave a presentation on dendrochronology: the study of tree- m Arch Kennedy 1995 ring analysis. Michaelsen made several points during 81 9 Robert A l Alarciano 1995 his presentation, which included the following. 1) The 830 John Scalzi 1995 average precipitation in the Southwest has not changed 831 Steve Adamson 1995 much over the last 400 years, which suggests that if 832 Neal Barton Jr. 1995 changes are occurring they are at a slow pace. 2) 833 Peter L. Bouchard II 1995 Although dendrochronology is one of the most accu- 83H Christopher Al. Farrell 1995 rate proxy records for reconstructing rainfall, it is by no 835 Craig W. Moeller 1995 means as accurate as written precipitation records. 83G Jeff Kirk 1995 Specifically, major flooding events are not likely to be 831 Kevin P. Lemanowicz 1995 recorded. 3) In the last century, wet years have been more common than in the previous 300 years, while extremely dry years have been less common. 4) The Big Cone Spruce tree seems to be the best tree for -Radio Seals of Approval analysis since it develops distinct growth rings based (Listed by Certificate Number) solely on precipitation as it usually thrives on steep slopes with shallow soil horizons and does not con- sume significant groundwater like the Valley Oak trees. 5) High elevation trees are generally less ac- 753 Michael S. LaPoint 1995 40 4 Vol. 76, No. 2, February 1995

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial