New Additions to AMS's Web Site

New Additions to AMS's Web Site Kansas City Chapter President Pat Cooper welcomed over 40 Ji/Lemjcuawi people to the 13 November 1997 meeting. Cooper began the meeting with a series of announcements and discussed the participation by members of the local 9tyt. <^e/n. 3hcmaA ji/Lcmmun chapter in the upcoming AMS Annual Meeting in Phoenix. 1910-1997 The featured speaker of the evening was Wayne Higgins, who is a research meteorologist in the Analy- sis Branch of NCEP' s (National Centers for Environ- mental Prediction) Climate Prediction Center in Camp 1910-1997 Springs, Maryland. The title of Higgins's presentation was "Oceanic and Atmospheric Anomalies in the Glo- bal Tropics: The 1997 El Nino." He talked about the evolution of oceanic and atmo- spheric anomalies in the tropical Pacific during the New Additions transition from weak cold episode conditions in early t(0)A\MS§ Web Site 1997 to strong warm episode conditions by mid-1997. A historical comparison of the 1997 event to previ- ous strong warm episodes in the last 50 years was used The AMS updates its Web site with new in- to illustrate important aspects of the timing and am- formation monthly. We hope our membership plitude of the current event. Higgins also presented the and others interested in AMS will regularly go NCEP statistical and coupled model forecasts for the to the site to obtain the latest information on remainder of 1997 and early 1998. The forecasts that meetings, journals, chapters, AMS contacts, the Higgins presented showed that the current event is monthly AMS Newsletter, and other information. very strong and is forecast to stay strong at least In the past few months, we have added a num- through the next two quarters. ber of new items. These are as follows. He then went on to explain how in the last couple of years the efforts of the climate center to monitor • 10-Year AMS Vision Study the state of the ocean-atmosphere coupled system have greatly benefitted from the NCEP/NCAR (Na- • Earth Sciences Historical Page tional Center for Atmospheric Prediction) Reanalysis Project (Kalnay et al. 1996, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., • February 1998 AMS Newsletter 77, 437-471) and a parallel ocean reanalysis project (Ji et al. 1995, Mon. Wea. Rev., 123, 460-481). He • Meetings programs and calls for papers explained that in the Reanalysis Project a fixed state-of-the-art data assimilation system and large in- • From Headquarters column, Bulletin, Vol. 78, put observational database has been used to reanalyze Nos. I—12 the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere for the period 1957 to the present. To maintain homoge- neity in the future the same data assimilation system is being run in near real time as a climate data assimi- lation system (CDAS). In next part of his presentation, Higgins relied heavily on the CDAS/reanalysis data archive for the atmospheric analyses and the ocean reanalysis data archive for the oceanic analyses to show what type of weather might occur in the Mid- west based on past El Nino events. Higgins also gave an interview with Channel 4 me- teorologis t Joe Lauria at the meeting.—Jim http://www.ametsoc.org/AM S Henderson. • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 3 34 5 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

New Additions to AMS's Web Site

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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-79.2.345b
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Abstract

Kansas City Chapter President Pat Cooper welcomed over 40 Ji/Lemjcuawi people to the 13 November 1997 meeting. Cooper began the meeting with a series of announcements and discussed the participation by members of the local 9tyt. <^e/n. 3hcmaA ji/Lcmmun chapter in the upcoming AMS Annual Meeting in Phoenix. 1910-1997 The featured speaker of the evening was Wayne Higgins, who is a research meteorologist in the Analy- sis Branch of NCEP' s (National Centers for Environ- mental Prediction) Climate Prediction Center in Camp 1910-1997 Springs, Maryland. The title of Higgins's presentation was "Oceanic and Atmospheric Anomalies in the Glo- bal Tropics: The 1997 El Nino." He talked about the evolution of oceanic and atmo- spheric anomalies in the tropical Pacific during the New Additions transition from weak cold episode conditions in early t(0)A\MS§ Web Site 1997 to strong warm episode conditions by mid-1997. A historical comparison of the 1997 event to previ- ous strong warm episodes in the last 50 years was used The AMS updates its Web site with new in- to illustrate important aspects of the timing and am- formation monthly. We hope our membership plitude of the current event. Higgins also presented the and others interested in AMS will regularly go NCEP statistical and coupled model forecasts for the to the site to obtain the latest information on remainder of 1997 and early 1998. The forecasts that meetings, journals, chapters, AMS contacts, the Higgins presented showed that the current event is monthly AMS Newsletter, and other information. very strong and is forecast to stay strong at least In the past few months, we have added a num- through the next two quarters. ber of new items. These are as follows. He then went on to explain how in the last couple of years the efforts of the climate center to monitor • 10-Year AMS Vision Study the state of the ocean-atmosphere coupled system have greatly benefitted from the NCEP/NCAR (Na- • Earth Sciences Historical Page tional Center for Atmospheric Prediction) Reanalysis Project (Kalnay et al. 1996, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., • February 1998 AMS Newsletter 77, 437-471) and a parallel ocean reanalysis project (Ji et al. 1995, Mon. Wea. Rev., 123, 460-481). He • Meetings programs and calls for papers explained that in the Reanalysis Project a fixed state-of-the-art data assimilation system and large in- • From Headquarters column, Bulletin, Vol. 78, put observational database has been used to reanalyze Nos. I—12 the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere for the period 1957 to the present. To maintain homoge- neity in the future the same data assimilation system is being run in near real time as a climate data assimi- lation system (CDAS). In next part of his presentation, Higgins relied heavily on the CDAS/reanalysis data archive for the atmospheric analyses and the ocean reanalysis data archive for the oceanic analyses to show what type of weather might occur in the Mid- west based on past El Nino events. Higgins also gave an interview with Channel 4 me- teorologis t Joe Lauria at the meeting.—Jim http://www.ametsoc.org/AM S Henderson. • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 3 34 5

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Feb 1, 1998

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