necrologies

necrologies Richard Earl Myers After graduating from the University of Nebraska, 1911-1992 he taught in several eastern Nebraska high schools. In March 1940, he entered the Weather Bureau Office in Lincoln, Nebraska. Shortly after the start of World War Richard Earl Myers died II, he transferred to the Weather Analysis Center in 9 January 1992 in Lincoln, Washington, D.C. He served as a forecaster with the Nebraska, of complications Weather Bureau Airport Station, Stapleton Field, Den- suffered from a ruptured in- ver, Colorado, from 1944 to 1949 and from 1952 to testine and a series of 1959. From 1949 to 1952, he was assigned to Shan- strokes. During his career, non Airport, Republic of Ireland, as an overseas air- Myers served as a forecaster ways forecaster. In 1959, Myers returned to the for the National Weather Ser- Weather Bureau Office in Lincoln as meteorologist in vice in Lincoln, Nebraska; charge (MIC) and state climatologist for Nebraska. In Washington, D.C.; and Denver, Colorado. He also April 1964, when the Weather Bureau Airport Station served as Nebraska state climatologist and as a opened at the Lincoln Municipal Airport, he relin- lecturer in meteorology at the University of Nebraska. quished his role as MIC to remain in the city office of Myers was the author of many publications on the the Weather Bureau as state climatologist. From 1959 relationship of temperature, hail, and precipitation to until his retirement, he served as lecturer in meteorol- agriculture in Nebraska, and he also helped devise ogy at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and as a tornado warning systemsfor specific areas. Inthemid- consultant on climatological problems for the staff and 1950s, he was assigned to a special research team in graduate students. He also served as the acting New York City that was devising a system of upper-air climatologist for the central region of the National analysis to be used in forecasting transatlantic flights. Weather Service during the mid-1960s. After he re- Myers was born in Polk, Nebraska. He graduated tired, Myers served as a consultant in climatology for from the University of Nebraska with a bachelor's the University of Nebraska, without compensation. degree in science and received a master's degree in agricultural meteorology from Iowa State University in He is survived by his wife, Irene (Gardiner) Myers; Ames, Iowa. He took many courses by correspon- a daughter, Fern Meston of Aurora, Colorado; three dence from accredited schools of meteorology, which grandchildren; and ten great-grandchildren. • enabled him to attain the classification of meteorolo- gist. Myers was a member of Sigma Xi. Use of weather radar pictures extended The use of radar in the detection of precipitation has become so valuable that the Weather Bureau has developed a program to extend its advantages to as many users as resources will permit. The high cost of radar sets limits their installation to key locations throughout the country. The Bureau's comparatively inexpensive Radar-Telephone Transmission System converts the signal received by the main radar set and transmits the same radar picture to other stations. This was made possible by developing a slow-scan process that televises the picture on the main radar scope and carries it by telephone lines to a remote station, where the image is displayed on an ordinary video tube. The telephone lines can carry the signal as far as 500 miles to the remote receiver, which in turn can feed six television sets within 1000 ft. OJ% i/A^f e This low-cost program proved practical after extensive y&3rS 3CJO testing, and field installations were started in 1967. As many as 30 Weather Bureau stations will have remoted display from nearby radar sets by 1970 under the current schedule. Other military and civilian weather departments will also be able to avail themselves of the service.— Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 65. • Bulletin American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-74.1.113a
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Abstract

Richard Earl Myers After graduating from the University of Nebraska, 1911-1992 he taught in several eastern Nebraska high schools. In March 1940, he entered the Weather Bureau Office in Lincoln, Nebraska. Shortly after the start of World War Richard Earl Myers died II, he transferred to the Weather Analysis Center in 9 January 1992 in Lincoln, Washington, D.C. He served as a forecaster with the Nebraska, of complications Weather Bureau Airport Station, Stapleton Field, Den- suffered from a ruptured in- ver, Colorado, from 1944 to 1949 and from 1952 to testine and a series of 1959. From 1949 to 1952, he was assigned to Shan- strokes. During his career, non Airport, Republic of Ireland, as an overseas air- Myers served as a forecaster ways forecaster. In 1959, Myers returned to the for the National Weather Ser- Weather Bureau Office in Lincoln as meteorologist in vice in Lincoln, Nebraska; charge (MIC) and state climatologist for Nebraska. In Washington, D.C.; and Denver, Colorado. He also April 1964, when the Weather Bureau Airport Station served as Nebraska state climatologist and as a opened at the Lincoln Municipal Airport, he relin- lecturer in meteorology at the University of Nebraska. quished his role as MIC to remain in the city office of Myers was the author of many publications on the the Weather Bureau as state climatologist. From 1959 relationship of temperature, hail, and precipitation to until his retirement, he served as lecturer in meteorol- agriculture in Nebraska, and he also helped devise ogy at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and as a tornado warning systemsfor specific areas. Inthemid- consultant on climatological problems for the staff and 1950s, he was assigned to a special research team in graduate students. He also served as the acting New York City that was devising a system of upper-air climatologist for the central region of the National analysis to be used in forecasting transatlantic flights. Weather Service during the mid-1960s. After he re- Myers was born in Polk, Nebraska. He graduated tired, Myers served as a consultant in climatology for from the University of Nebraska with a bachelor's the University of Nebraska, without compensation. degree in science and received a master's degree in agricultural meteorology from Iowa State University in He is survived by his wife, Irene (Gardiner) Myers; Ames, Iowa. He took many courses by correspon- a daughter, Fern Meston of Aurora, Colorado; three dence from accredited schools of meteorology, which grandchildren; and ten great-grandchildren. • enabled him to attain the classification of meteorolo- gist. Myers was a member of Sigma Xi. Use of weather radar pictures extended The use of radar in the detection of precipitation has become so valuable that the Weather Bureau has developed a program to extend its advantages to as many users as resources will permit. The high cost of radar sets limits their installation to key locations throughout the country. The Bureau's comparatively inexpensive Radar-Telephone Transmission System converts the signal received by the main radar set and transmits the same radar picture to other stations. This was made possible by developing a slow-scan process that televises the picture on the main radar scope and carries it by telephone lines to a remote station, where the image is displayed on an ordinary video tube. The telephone lines can carry the signal as far as 500 miles to the remote receiver, which in turn can feed six television sets within 1000 ft. OJ% i/A^f e This low-cost program proved practical after extensive y&3rS 3CJO testing, and field installations were started in 1967. As many as 30 Weather Bureau stations will have remoted display from nearby radar sets by 1970 under the current schedule. Other military and civilian weather departments will also be able to avail themselves of the service.— Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 49, 65. • Bulletin American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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