More on the Scale Dependence of the Predictability of Precipitation Patterns: Extension to the 2009–13 CAPS Spring Experiment Ensemble Forecasts

More on the Scale Dependence of the Predictability of Precipitation Patterns: Extension to the... AbstractThis paper analyzes the scale and case dependence of the predictability of precipitation in the Storm-Scale Ensemble Forecast (SSEF) system run by the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) during the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Experiments of 2008–13. The effect of different types of ensemble perturbation methodologies is quantified as a function of spatial scale. It is found that uncertainties in the large-scale initial and boundary conditions and in the model microphysical parameterization scheme can result in the loss of predictability at scales smaller than 200 km after 24 h. Also, these uncertainties account for most of the forecast error. Other types of ensemble perturbation methodologies were not found to be as important for the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs). The case dependences of predictability and of the sensitivity to the ensemble perturbation methodology were also analyzed. Events were characterized in terms of the extent of the precipitation coverage and of the convective-adjustment time scale , an indicator of whether convection is in equilibrium with the large-scale forcing. It was found that events characterized by widespread precipitation and small values (representative of quasi-equilibrium convection) were usually more predictable than nonequilibrium cases. No significant statistical relationship was found between the relative role of different perturbation methodologies and precipitation coverage or . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Monthly Weather Review American Meteorological Society

More on the Scale Dependence of the Predictability of Precipitation Patterns: Extension to the 2009–13 CAPS Spring Experiment Ensemble Forecasts

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0493
eISSN
1520-0493
D.O.I.
10.1175/MWR-D-16-0362.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper analyzes the scale and case dependence of the predictability of precipitation in the Storm-Scale Ensemble Forecast (SSEF) system run by the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) during the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Experiments of 2008–13. The effect of different types of ensemble perturbation methodologies is quantified as a function of spatial scale. It is found that uncertainties in the large-scale initial and boundary conditions and in the model microphysical parameterization scheme can result in the loss of predictability at scales smaller than 200 km after 24 h. Also, these uncertainties account for most of the forecast error. Other types of ensemble perturbation methodologies were not found to be as important for the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs). The case dependences of predictability and of the sensitivity to the ensemble perturbation methodology were also analyzed. Events were characterized in terms of the extent of the precipitation coverage and of the convective-adjustment time scale , an indicator of whether convection is in equilibrium with the large-scale forcing. It was found that events characterized by widespread precipitation and small values (representative of quasi-equilibrium convection) were usually more predictable than nonequilibrium cases. No significant statistical relationship was found between the relative role of different perturbation methodologies and precipitation coverage or .

Journal

Monthly Weather ReviewAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 19, 2017

References

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