Momentum flux of convective gravity waves derived from an off-line gravity wave parameterization. Part I: Spatiotemporal variations at source level

Momentum flux of convective gravity waves derived from an off-line gravity wave parameterization.... AbstractSpatiotemporal variations in momentum flux spectra of convective gravity waves (CGWs) at the source level (cloud top), including nonlinear forcing effects, are examined based on calculation using an off-line version of CGW parameterization and global reanalysis data for a period of 32 years (1979-2010). The cloud-top momentum flux (CTMF) is not solely proportional to the convective heating rate but is affected by the wave-filtering and resonance factor and background stability and temperature underlying the convection. Consequently, the primary peak of CTMF is in the winter hemisphere midlatitudes, associated with storm tracks, where a secondary peak of convective heating exists, whereas the secondary peak of CTMF appears in the summer hemisphere tropics and intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), where the primary peak of convective heating exists. The magnitude of CTMF fluctuates largely with 1-year and 1-day periods in major CTMF regions. At low latitudes and Pacific storm-track regions, a 6-month period is also significant, and the decadal cycle appears in the Southern Andes. The equatorial eastern Pacific region exhibits a substantial inter-annual to decadal scale of variabilities. The correlation between convective heating and the CTMF is relatively lower in the equatorial region than in other regions. The CTMF in 10°N-10°S during the period of PreConcordiasi campaign approximately follows a lognormal distribution, but with a slight underestimation in the tail of the probability density function. In Part II, the momentum flux and drag of CGW in the stratosphere will be examined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences American Meteorological Society

Momentum flux of convective gravity waves derived from an off-line gravity wave parameterization. Part I: Spatiotemporal variations at source level

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0469
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAS-D-17-0053.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractSpatiotemporal variations in momentum flux spectra of convective gravity waves (CGWs) at the source level (cloud top), including nonlinear forcing effects, are examined based on calculation using an off-line version of CGW parameterization and global reanalysis data for a period of 32 years (1979-2010). The cloud-top momentum flux (CTMF) is not solely proportional to the convective heating rate but is affected by the wave-filtering and resonance factor and background stability and temperature underlying the convection. Consequently, the primary peak of CTMF is in the winter hemisphere midlatitudes, associated with storm tracks, where a secondary peak of convective heating exists, whereas the secondary peak of CTMF appears in the summer hemisphere tropics and intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), where the primary peak of convective heating exists. The magnitude of CTMF fluctuates largely with 1-year and 1-day periods in major CTMF regions. At low latitudes and Pacific storm-track regions, a 6-month period is also significant, and the decadal cycle appears in the Southern Andes. The equatorial eastern Pacific region exhibits a substantial inter-annual to decadal scale of variabilities. The correlation between convective heating and the CTMF is relatively lower in the equatorial region than in other regions. The CTMF in 10°N-10°S during the period of PreConcordiasi campaign approximately follows a lognormal distribution, but with a slight underestimation in the tail of the probability density function. In Part II, the momentum flux and drag of CGW in the stratosphere will be examined.

Journal

Journal of the Atmospheric SciencesAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jul 19, 2017

References

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