meeting review

meeting review Global Climate Change and Tropical Cyclones James Lighthill,* Greg Hollands William Gray,# Christopher Landsea,# George Craig,@ Jenni Evans,& Yoshio Kurihara,** and Charles Guard++ Abstract The authors conclude that, even though the possibility of some minor indirect effects of global warming on TC frequency and intensity cannot be excluded, they must effectively be "swamped" by large This paper offers an overview of the authors' studies during a natural variability. specialized international symposium (Mexico, 22 November-1 De- cember 1993) where they aimed at making an objective assessment of whether climate changes, consequent on an expected doubling of atmospheric C0 in the next six or seven decades, are likely to 1. Introduction increase significantly the frequency or intensity of tropical cyclones (TC). Out of three methodologies available for addressing the ques- tion they employ two, discarding the third for reasons set out in the As part of the joint World Meteorological Organiza- appendix. tion/International Council of Scientific Unions (WMO/ In the first methodology, the authors enumerate reasons why, in ICSU) program on tropical cyclone disasters it was tropical oceans, the increase in sea surface temperature (SST) agreed that the WMO/ICSU Third International Work- suggested by climate change models might be expected to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

meeting review

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/meeting-review-thNTg8sHBA
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/1520-0477-75.11.2147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Climate Change and Tropical Cyclones James Lighthill,* Greg Hollands William Gray,# Christopher Landsea,# George Craig,@ Jenni Evans,& Yoshio Kurihara,** and Charles Guard++ Abstract The authors conclude that, even though the possibility of some minor indirect effects of global warming on TC frequency and intensity cannot be excluded, they must effectively be "swamped" by large This paper offers an overview of the authors' studies during a natural variability. specialized international symposium (Mexico, 22 November-1 De- cember 1993) where they aimed at making an objective assessment of whether climate changes, consequent on an expected doubling of atmospheric C0 in the next six or seven decades, are likely to 1. Introduction increase significantly the frequency or intensity of tropical cyclones (TC). Out of three methodologies available for addressing the ques- tion they employ two, discarding the third for reasons set out in the As part of the joint World Meteorological Organiza- appendix. tion/International Council of Scientific Unions (WMO/ In the first methodology, the authors enumerate reasons why, in ICSU) program on tropical cyclone disasters it was tropical oceans, the increase in sea surface temperature (SST) agreed that the WMO/ICSU Third International Work- suggested by climate change models might be expected to

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial