Making Climate Data Sing: Using Music-like Sonifications to Convey a Key Climate Record

Making Climate Data Sing: Using Music-like Sonifications to Convey a Key Climate Record SIGHTS AND SOUNDS MAKING CLIMATE DATA SING Using Music-like Sonifications to Convey a Key Climate Record Scott St . Geor Ge, Daniel c rawfor D, t o DD r eubol D, an D elizabeth Gior Gi cientists usually transmit evidence about cli- mate change via information-rich data graphics. SVisualizations such as the Keeling Curve or the “‘Hockey Stick” are icons of climate science, and charts and maps illustrating the most recent changes in global temperatures are the subject of intensive news coverage and significant public interest upon their release. A well-designed graphic can help audiences to quickly understand the main message embedded within a complex set of climate data and to retain those ideas longer than if they were conveyed by words alone. But these visual aids also have limitations: they are most easily understood by people who are fluent in technical illustrations; they are usually static and sometimes do not tell an obvious story; and many people do not respond to them emotionally. Music, by contrast, builds each note or phrase upon those that came before, and can exert a powerful influence on human emotions. Because of these Fig . 1. Schematic diagram illustrating how climate characteristics, sonification http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Making Climate Data Sing: Using Music-like Sonifications to Convey a Key Climate Record

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
eISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00223.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS MAKING CLIMATE DATA SING Using Music-like Sonifications to Convey a Key Climate Record Scott St . Geor Ge, Daniel c rawfor D, t o DD r eubol D, an D elizabeth Gior Gi cientists usually transmit evidence about cli- mate change via information-rich data graphics. SVisualizations such as the Keeling Curve or the “‘Hockey Stick” are icons of climate science, and charts and maps illustrating the most recent changes in global temperatures are the subject of intensive news coverage and significant public interest upon their release. A well-designed graphic can help audiences to quickly understand the main message embedded within a complex set of climate data and to retain those ideas longer than if they were conveyed by words alone. But these visual aids also have limitations: they are most easily understood by people who are fluent in technical illustrations; they are usually static and sometimes do not tell an obvious story; and many people do not respond to them emotionally. Music, by contrast, builds each note or phrase upon those that came before, and can exert a powerful influence on human emotions. Because of these Fig . 1. Schematic diagram illustrating how climate characteristics, sonification

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 2017

References

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