Large Tank Evaluation of a GPS Wave Buoy for Wind Stress Measurements

Large Tank Evaluation of a GPS Wave Buoy for Wind Stress Measurements AbstractThere exists considerable disagreement among the observed values of the drag coefficient CD. To develop a model of CD, the wind stress generally will be calculated from the eddy correlation method. A buoy is suitable to measure the wind stress in many sea surface conditions. However, the motion correction is very difficult because the anemometer measures the wind components, including the motion of the buoy. In this study, as a first approach, the motion of a prototype buoy system with a three-axis sonic anemometer and a six-axis motion sensor installed in the small-size GPS observation buoy was investigated. The wave tank is in the ocean engineering basin of the Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Japan. The imposed conditions were wave periods from 1.1 to 2.5 s; wind speeds of 0, 2, and 5 m s−1; and the wave spectrum was either regular or irregular. The motion of the buoy was measured in 120 cases. For all the wave periods and without wind, the wind velocity measured by the sonic anemometer and the velocity of the anemometer motion calculated from the motion sensor data showed good agreement. Also, in the condition with wind speeds of 2 and 5 m s−1, the motion-corrected wind velocity, obtained by deducting the velocity of the anemometer motion from the wind velocity measured by the anemometer, yielded the true wind velocity with better-than-average (4.3%) accuracy. The friction velocity from corrected wind velocity components shows agreement with the friction velocity measured from a fixed sonic anemometer within expected intrinsic error. The buoy system is expected to be able to measure the wind stress in the field. The next stage is to do comprehensive field tests. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology American Meteorological Society

Large Tank Evaluation of a GPS Wave Buoy for Wind Stress Measurements

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/large-tank-evaluation-of-a-gps-wave-buoy-for-wind-stress-measurements-06oNqfvlNJ
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0426
eISSN
1520-0426
D.O.I.
10.1175/JTECH-D-16-0050.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThere exists considerable disagreement among the observed values of the drag coefficient CD. To develop a model of CD, the wind stress generally will be calculated from the eddy correlation method. A buoy is suitable to measure the wind stress in many sea surface conditions. However, the motion correction is very difficult because the anemometer measures the wind components, including the motion of the buoy. In this study, as a first approach, the motion of a prototype buoy system with a three-axis sonic anemometer and a six-axis motion sensor installed in the small-size GPS observation buoy was investigated. The wave tank is in the ocean engineering basin of the Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Japan. The imposed conditions were wave periods from 1.1 to 2.5 s; wind speeds of 0, 2, and 5 m s−1; and the wave spectrum was either regular or irregular. The motion of the buoy was measured in 120 cases. For all the wave periods and without wind, the wind velocity measured by the sonic anemometer and the velocity of the anemometer motion calculated from the motion sensor data showed good agreement. Also, in the condition with wind speeds of 2 and 5 m s−1, the motion-corrected wind velocity, obtained by deducting the velocity of the anemometer motion from the wind velocity measured by the anemometer, yielded the true wind velocity with better-than-average (4.3%) accuracy. The friction velocity from corrected wind velocity components shows agreement with the friction velocity measured from a fixed sonic anemometer within expected intrinsic error. The buoy system is expected to be able to measure the wind stress in the field. The next stage is to do comprehensive field tests.

Journal

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic TechnologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 18, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off