In Memoriam

In Memoriam The last place to attract Kaplan was Atmospheric waitress was trying in vain to get our attention. Fi- and Environmental Research (AER) in Cambridge, nally, somehow, she asked "Are you two brothers?" Massachusetts. He joined AER in 1981 as a principal Lew stopped, looked at her, and said, "In many ways!" scientist. AER provided him with an opportunity to This is how it was. We were close friends and col- infuse his thoughts and his philosophy into the private leagues as well as close family until the end. He will research sector in the United States. From AER he in- be sorely missed. teracted freely on matters related to meteorology with Lewis married Lillian Vond Epstein in 1942. To- nearly all the government agencies with whom he had gether, they shared life until his death. Lillian, their previous connections: NASA, NOAA, DOE, and daughter Rebecca Miriam Nemser, her husband, and DoD. Kaplan felt at home at AER the same way he their son Alexander live in Massachusetts. Lewis felt in academia or in government service. He re- Kaplan's legacy will long endure and continue to mained at AER until his retirement in 1993. grow as the concepts he developed for remote sens- For the rest of his life Kaplan continued to speak ing continue to enable a new generation of scientists for better sounders using his deep insight into spec- to peer into spectra and study the world.—Moustafa troscopy and his knowledge of the working of numeri- T. Chahine (chahine@jpl.nasa.gov). • cal weather prediction models as a guide. In 1982, shortly after leaving the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center he was appointed "Distinguished Visiting Sci- entist" at JPL. Even after he had formally retired, he continued to provide advice and council to JPL and to ^ 4 his former and new colleagues there. In his landmark paper of 1959, his vision of the future benefit of remote sensing was prophetic. In his words, "earth satellites hold the promise of continu- ous and truly global sounding of the atmosphere and would be capable of giving us a very satisfactory con- tinuous picture of the temperature and moisture pat- tern of that part of the atmosphere which is above the clouds and above the cloudless ground and ocean. Tied in with adequate measurements at the earth's surface we would then have a continuous knowledge of the In Memoriam changing structure of our atmosphere. With such a continuous knowledge of the global atmospheric prop- erties it should certainly be easier to form a coherent picture of the important atmospheric processes." V. Gene Blanchette Kaplan did more than anyone else to establish the 1919-199 9 physics of molecular spectroscopy as the foundation of observations from space. This achievement grew Walte r D. Castle out of his deep conviction that remote sensing is a 1923-199 9 branch of physics. He had little use for ideas that could not be given a physical embodiment. Franklin S. Harris Jr. I would like to end this with a personal note. I have 1912-199 9 known Lewis for more than 30 years, since 1965 when he was at JPL. Even now, I still vividly recall the dis- Charles M. Lennahan cussions, the seminars, and the debates we had on 1906-199 9 many subjects and issues. During one of our frequent visits in the 1970s to the NAS A/Goddar d Institute for Henry J. McDade Space Studies in New York City we used to go a small 1912-199 9 cafeteria nearby for breakfast. The people working there knew us well. One time he and I were sitting in the cafeteria engaged in a deep discussion while the 2322 Vol. 80, , No. 1 7, November 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

The last place to attract Kaplan was Atmospheric waitress was trying in vain to get our attention. Fi- and Environmental Research (AER) in Cambridge, nally, somehow, she asked "Are you two brothers?" Massachusetts. He joined AER in 1981 as a principal Lew stopped, looked at her, and said, "In many ways!" scientist. AER provided him with an opportunity to This is how it was. We were close friends and col- infuse his thoughts and his philosophy into the private leagues as well as close family until the end. He will research sector in the United States. From AER he in- be sorely missed. teracted freely on matters related to meteorology with Lewis married Lillian Vond Epstein in 1942. To- nearly all the government agencies with whom he had gether, they shared life until his death. Lillian, their previous connections: NASA, NOAA, DOE, and daughter Rebecca Miriam Nemser, her husband, and DoD. Kaplan felt at home at AER the same way he their son Alexander live in Massachusetts. Lewis felt in academia or in government service. He re- Kaplan's legacy will long endure and continue to mained at AER until his retirement in 1993. grow as the concepts he developed for remote sens- For the rest of his life Kaplan continued to speak ing continue to enable a new generation of scientists for better sounders using his deep insight into spec- to peer into spectra and study the world.—Moustafa troscopy and his knowledge of the working of numeri- T. Chahine (chahine@jpl.nasa.gov). • cal weather prediction models as a guide. In 1982, shortly after leaving the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center he was appointed "Distinguished Visiting Sci- entist" at JPL. Even after he had formally retired, he continued to provide advice and council to JPL and to ^ 4 his former and new colleagues there. In his landmark paper of 1959, his vision of the future benefit of remote sensing was prophetic. In his words, "earth satellites hold the promise of continu- ous and truly global sounding of the atmosphere and would be capable of giving us a very satisfactory con- tinuous picture of the temperature and moisture pat- tern of that part of the atmosphere which is above the clouds and above the cloudless ground and ocean. Tied in with adequate measurements at the earth's surface we would then have a continuous knowledge of the In Memoriam changing structure of our atmosphere. With such a continuous knowledge of the global atmospheric prop- erties it should certainly be easier to form a coherent picture of the important atmospheric processes." V. Gene Blanchette Kaplan did more than anyone else to establish the 1919-199 9 physics of molecular spectroscopy as the foundation of observations from space. This achievement grew Walte r D. Castle out of his deep conviction that remote sensing is a 1923-199 9 branch of physics. He had little use for ideas that could not be given a physical embodiment. Franklin S. Harris Jr. I would like to end this with a personal note. I have 1912-199 9 known Lewis for more than 30 years, since 1965 when he was at JPL. Even now, I still vividly recall the dis- Charles M. Lennahan cussions, the seminars, and the debates we had on 1906-199 9 many subjects and issues. During one of our frequent visits in the 1970s to the NAS A/Goddar d Institute for Henry J. McDade Space Studies in New York City we used to go a small 1912-199 9 cafeteria nearby for breakfast. The people working there knew us well. One time he and I were sitting in the cafeteria engaged in a deep discussion while the 2322 Vol. 80, , No. 1 7, November 1999

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Nov 1, 1999

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