In Memoriam

In Memoriam for several years. In 1949, he received his M.S. in meteorology EJAZO<14 Ncte from the University of Chicago and was The Bulletin relies on its readership for timely infor- deputy director of the mation on members' accomplishments, chapter hap- Iraq Meteorological penings, conferences, and science fairs. Service until Septem- ber 1950. Following About Our Members this, he continued his News about members who have won an award, studies at the Univer- been promoted, retired, or completed a project Mikhail A. Alaka sity of Chicago and was awarded his Ph.D. Chapter News in 1955. Updates on chapter meetings, community projects, and workshops Alaka spent the following six years in Geneva, Switzerland, as a technical officer and deputy chief Announcements of the Investigation Section of the WMO Secretariat. The latest on conferences, publications, or tours He returned to the United States in December 1960 and served as a research meteorologist with the Na- Submit contributions to Bulletin News Editor, AMS, tional Hurricane Research Project in Miami, Florida, 45 Beacon St., Boston, MA 02108-3693; fax 617- where he conducted and supervised research in tropi- 742-8718; e-mail: jburba@ametsoc.org. cal meteorology, particularly on hurricane genesis and development. After a brief assignment as a supervi- sory research meteorologist with the Clear Air Tur- bulence Research Project in Washington, D.C., he joined the Technique Development Laboratory (TDL) and officially assumed the duties of deputy director of the TDL, Systems Development Office, NWS, in October 1976. He was also chief of the Special ¥ ^ Projects Branch, TDL, a position he held since 1967. With a broad research background in dynamic and synoptic meteorology, Alaka published papers on the general circulation, the jet stream, hurricanes, moun- tain waves, severe convective weather, and optimum meteorological networks. At TDL, he supervised re- j(/Lemxyda^ search on the meteorological applications of digitized radar, forecasting severe weather potential, and mod- eling the planetary boundary layer. Alaka participated in the work of several national and international committees. Some of his outstand- 3*ted SScMi^Ama an ing domestic achievements included leadership in 1917-1996 preparing a national plan for mesometeorology. On the international level, he was considered a pioneer in Global Atmospheric Research Program matters. He ^gudci was a member of the AMS and the Royal Meteoro- logical Society. 1930-1996 Retiring in 1981, Alaka moved to La Costa, Cali- fornia, where he died 7 March 1996. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; daughters, Leyla Zuaiter, Aida Rury, and Mona Gladinus; and seven grandchildren. —Ellen Alaka. • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1305 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-77.6.1305
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Abstract

for several years. In 1949, he received his M.S. in meteorology EJAZO<14 Ncte from the University of Chicago and was The Bulletin relies on its readership for timely infor- deputy director of the mation on members' accomplishments, chapter hap- Iraq Meteorological penings, conferences, and science fairs. Service until Septem- ber 1950. Following About Our Members this, he continued his News about members who have won an award, studies at the Univer- been promoted, retired, or completed a project Mikhail A. Alaka sity of Chicago and was awarded his Ph.D. Chapter News in 1955. Updates on chapter meetings, community projects, and workshops Alaka spent the following six years in Geneva, Switzerland, as a technical officer and deputy chief Announcements of the Investigation Section of the WMO Secretariat. The latest on conferences, publications, or tours He returned to the United States in December 1960 and served as a research meteorologist with the Na- Submit contributions to Bulletin News Editor, AMS, tional Hurricane Research Project in Miami, Florida, 45 Beacon St., Boston, MA 02108-3693; fax 617- where he conducted and supervised research in tropi- 742-8718; e-mail: jburba@ametsoc.org. cal meteorology, particularly on hurricane genesis and development. After a brief assignment as a supervi- sory research meteorologist with the Clear Air Tur- bulence Research Project in Washington, D.C., he joined the Technique Development Laboratory (TDL) and officially assumed the duties of deputy director of the TDL, Systems Development Office, NWS, in October 1976. He was also chief of the Special ¥ ^ Projects Branch, TDL, a position he held since 1967. With a broad research background in dynamic and synoptic meteorology, Alaka published papers on the general circulation, the jet stream, hurricanes, moun- tain waves, severe convective weather, and optimum meteorological networks. At TDL, he supervised re- j(/Lemxyda^ search on the meteorological applications of digitized radar, forecasting severe weather potential, and mod- eling the planetary boundary layer. Alaka participated in the work of several national and international committees. Some of his outstand- 3*ted SScMi^Ama an ing domestic achievements included leadership in 1917-1996 preparing a national plan for mesometeorology. On the international level, he was considered a pioneer in Global Atmospheric Research Program matters. He ^gudci was a member of the AMS and the Royal Meteoro- logical Society. 1930-1996 Retiring in 1981, Alaka moved to La Costa, Cali- fornia, where he died 7 March 1996. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; daughters, Leyla Zuaiter, Aida Rury, and Mona Gladinus; and seven grandchildren. —Ellen Alaka. • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1305

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1996

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