In Memoriam

In Memoriam 1976, he was commended by the commander, Naval Catherine, of Monterey. His family includes three Weather Service Command, for outstanding service sons, Charles of Monterey; Wayne of Philadelphia, and contributions to the U.S. Navy. Pennsylvania; and Luke of Hollywood, California; and Frank's favorite nonacademic pursuits included ten- one daughter, Maria Anderson of Merced, California. nis, choral-group singing, and music appreciation ac- He also has 10 grandchildren and 1 great-grand- tivities. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, child.—Robert J. Renard. Thomas J. Weitz general weather services. He remained there until his 1913-1998 retirement in 1979. At that time, he and his wife Dorothy moved to Thomas J. Weitz, forecaster with the U.S. Weather Roswell, New Mexico, where he continued to take Bureau, passed away at the age of 84 in February 1998. unofficial observations and do climate work for the lo- Weitz began his career with the U.S. Weather Bu- cal newspapers and radio stations. Tom received many reau in 1942 as a hydro-climatic inspector in San Fran- commendations throughout his federal service and cisco and Los Angeles, California. His position also in retirement. He had a desire to be a writer and involved inspecting and establishing stations and se- did have several stories published. lecting and appointing observers to these stations. In He is survived by a son and daughter, three grand- 1943, he was named official-in-charge at the Weather children, and five great-grandchildren. His wife had Bureau Airport Station, Prescott, Arizona, where he passed away in 1987.—John E. Rockey.• supervised short-range forecasting and flight briefing. He was transferred to the Weather Bureau Airport Station, Burbank, California, in August 1946, where he served as principal assistant. At that time, it was a seven-man station of observer briefs that provided ob- servations at Lockheed Air Terminal and briefing of ji/lemxmami pilots in person and by telephone for the San Fernando Valley. Weather information was also provided to lo- cal newspapers and radio stations and a few valley businesses, such as roofers and concrete contractors. Weitz oversaw the observational duties and was very 1920-1998 diligent in his work. He was very thorough, meticu- lous, and set a good example for the rest of the staff. He received a commendation for his observations dlo Sed W. JimtdaM and his testimony in an investigation of an aircraft 1911-1998 accident that occurred during increment weather at the airport. In early 1967, there was a fire at the terminal that destroyed the office and the Federal Aviation Administration facilities above the office. At that time, 3)(maM jtimiift it was determined not to restore the office but to have the control tower take the observations and have the pilot briefings done by the briefers at the forecast of- fice. There was a brief period at the forecast office for the Burbank personnel, then Weitz was reassigned to the Walla Walla, Washington, station. There he con- 1921-1998 centrated on short-range forecasting, fruit-frost fore- casting, consultation on agricultural meteorology, and Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 109 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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American Meteorological Society
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Copyright © American Meteorological Society
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1520-0477
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10.1175/1520-0477-80.1.109
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Abstract

1976, he was commended by the commander, Naval Catherine, of Monterey. His family includes three Weather Service Command, for outstanding service sons, Charles of Monterey; Wayne of Philadelphia, and contributions to the U.S. Navy. Pennsylvania; and Luke of Hollywood, California; and Frank's favorite nonacademic pursuits included ten- one daughter, Maria Anderson of Merced, California. nis, choral-group singing, and music appreciation ac- He also has 10 grandchildren and 1 great-grand- tivities. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, child.—Robert J. Renard. Thomas J. Weitz general weather services. He remained there until his 1913-1998 retirement in 1979. At that time, he and his wife Dorothy moved to Thomas J. Weitz, forecaster with the U.S. Weather Roswell, New Mexico, where he continued to take Bureau, passed away at the age of 84 in February 1998. unofficial observations and do climate work for the lo- Weitz began his career with the U.S. Weather Bu- cal newspapers and radio stations. Tom received many reau in 1942 as a hydro-climatic inspector in San Fran- commendations throughout his federal service and cisco and Los Angeles, California. His position also in retirement. He had a desire to be a writer and involved inspecting and establishing stations and se- did have several stories published. lecting and appointing observers to these stations. In He is survived by a son and daughter, three grand- 1943, he was named official-in-charge at the Weather children, and five great-grandchildren. His wife had Bureau Airport Station, Prescott, Arizona, where he passed away in 1987.—John E. Rockey.• supervised short-range forecasting and flight briefing. He was transferred to the Weather Bureau Airport Station, Burbank, California, in August 1946, where he served as principal assistant. At that time, it was a seven-man station of observer briefs that provided ob- servations at Lockheed Air Terminal and briefing of ji/lemxmami pilots in person and by telephone for the San Fernando Valley. Weather information was also provided to lo- cal newspapers and radio stations and a few valley businesses, such as roofers and concrete contractors. Weitz oversaw the observational duties and was very 1920-1998 diligent in his work. He was very thorough, meticu- lous, and set a good example for the rest of the staff. He received a commendation for his observations dlo Sed W. JimtdaM and his testimony in an investigation of an aircraft 1911-1998 accident that occurred during increment weather at the airport. In early 1967, there was a fire at the terminal that destroyed the office and the Federal Aviation Administration facilities above the office. At that time, 3)(maM jtimiift it was determined not to restore the office but to have the control tower take the observations and have the pilot briefings done by the briefers at the forecast of- fice. There was a brief period at the forecast office for the Burbank personnel, then Weitz was reassigned to the Walla Walla, Washington, station. There he con- 1921-1998 centrated on short-range forecasting, fruit-frost fore- casting, consultation on agricultural meteorology, and Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 109

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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