In Memoriam

In Memoriam weather forecasting through the use of AWIPS. On- dues ($10 annually) at the mini-technical conference. going product development, forecasting related to the —Amanda Clarke. recent ice storms that hit the Carolinas, and hydrologi- Chicago cal (river stage) forecasting were all discussed. The chapter reminded all members to think of topics The 1 February meeting of the chapter was held at for the Seventh Annual Palmetto AMS Mini-Techni- the Harold E. White Aviation Center, Lewis Univer- cal Conference. This meeting was held at the Univer- sity, Romeoville, Illinois. sity of South Carolina in Columbia on 10 March 2000. After a brief business session and review of the recent This meeting was an excellent forum for discussing AMS Annual Meeting, the main speaker William current meteorological interests throughout the area. Wontroba was introduced. Wontroba is the electronic The annual South Carolina Science and Engineer- systems analyst for the Chicago National Weather Ser- ing Fair was held on 24 March 2000. The chapter par- vice Forecast Office. The title of his talk was ticipates in the judging process of this event each year. "Transitioning from the Automation of Field Operations The election of chapter officers is coming up. Any- and Services Computer System (AFOS) to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) in the one who is interested in becoming the secretary/trea- Daily Operations of the Chicago Forecast Office." surer, please let one of the current officers know. Each officer will serve a year in each position, first as sec- Wontroba reviewed the "history" of AFOS, discuss- retary/treasurer, then as vice president, then as presi- ing the "front end" and "back end" processors and dent. Next year's officers will be chosen after the brought us to the present situation where only two con- mini-technical conference. soles remain, one in the computer room and the other Thanks to everyone who paid their dues at the last remotely stationed on the operations floor. The com- meeting. These dues are used to fund guest speaker missioning of AWIPS will see the elimination of these meals, science fair prizes, and to support the mini-tech- last two remnants of bygone days. nical conference. If you were not able to attend the last The speaker then described the five new Windows- meeting and wish to pay dues, send a check to Amanda operated Hewlitt Packard AWIPS workstations, which Clarke, this year's treasurer. Members may also pay are strategically placed in the operations area and how the system functions. A 16-ft diameter satellite dish downlinks to the redundant data servers, computers, satellite feeds and routers, which ensure nonstop 3 n jf/temoum/i sources of National Centers for Environmental Predic- tion/European guidance, weather observations, as well as other data. Wontroba further explained how a point-to-point NWS Central Region Frame relay system links to the 1917-2000 recently installed Local Data Acquisition and Dissemi- nation System, allows loading of data from the Auto- Jti/meM ^oidtem mated Surface Observation System, and in addition, Packet ham operator reports, Limited Automatic Re- 1916-2000 mote Collector Systems, hydrologic/climatological data, Internet Web sites, Mesonets, and also provides ^ecwjfje ^W. JtaAttmri firewall protection. In general, Wontroba brought the audience up to 1909-1999 date on the computer systems currently in use at the Chicago forecast office and fielded questions as he progressed in his informative and well-received talk. 1951-2000 Attendance was again excellent with approximately 40 members and guests. Next month's meeting will be at the Center Weather Service Unit (CWSU) at the FAA Air Traffic Control Center in Aurora. That program 1916-1999 will be presented by Patricia Wontroba, meteorologist- in-charge of the CWSU.—Paul Dailey. • Vol. 8 J, No. 5, May 2000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

weather forecasting through the use of AWIPS. On- dues ($10 annually) at the mini-technical conference. going product development, forecasting related to the —Amanda Clarke. recent ice storms that hit the Carolinas, and hydrologi- Chicago cal (river stage) forecasting were all discussed. The chapter reminded all members to think of topics The 1 February meeting of the chapter was held at for the Seventh Annual Palmetto AMS Mini-Techni- the Harold E. White Aviation Center, Lewis Univer- cal Conference. This meeting was held at the Univer- sity, Romeoville, Illinois. sity of South Carolina in Columbia on 10 March 2000. After a brief business session and review of the recent This meeting was an excellent forum for discussing AMS Annual Meeting, the main speaker William current meteorological interests throughout the area. Wontroba was introduced. Wontroba is the electronic The annual South Carolina Science and Engineer- systems analyst for the Chicago National Weather Ser- ing Fair was held on 24 March 2000. The chapter par- vice Forecast Office. The title of his talk was ticipates in the judging process of this event each year. "Transitioning from the Automation of Field Operations The election of chapter officers is coming up. Any- and Services Computer System (AFOS) to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) in the one who is interested in becoming the secretary/trea- Daily Operations of the Chicago Forecast Office." surer, please let one of the current officers know. Each officer will serve a year in each position, first as sec- Wontroba reviewed the "history" of AFOS, discuss- retary/treasurer, then as vice president, then as presi- ing the "front end" and "back end" processors and dent. Next year's officers will be chosen after the brought us to the present situation where only two con- mini-technical conference. soles remain, one in the computer room and the other Thanks to everyone who paid their dues at the last remotely stationed on the operations floor. The com- meeting. These dues are used to fund guest speaker missioning of AWIPS will see the elimination of these meals, science fair prizes, and to support the mini-tech- last two remnants of bygone days. nical conference. If you were not able to attend the last The speaker then described the five new Windows- meeting and wish to pay dues, send a check to Amanda operated Hewlitt Packard AWIPS workstations, which Clarke, this year's treasurer. Members may also pay are strategically placed in the operations area and how the system functions. A 16-ft diameter satellite dish downlinks to the redundant data servers, computers, satellite feeds and routers, which ensure nonstop 3 n jf/temoum/i sources of National Centers for Environmental Predic- tion/European guidance, weather observations, as well as other data. Wontroba further explained how a point-to-point NWS Central Region Frame relay system links to the 1917-2000 recently installed Local Data Acquisition and Dissemi- nation System, allows loading of data from the Auto- Jti/meM ^oidtem mated Surface Observation System, and in addition, Packet ham operator reports, Limited Automatic Re- 1916-2000 mote Collector Systems, hydrologic/climatological data, Internet Web sites, Mesonets, and also provides ^ecwjfje ^W. JtaAttmri firewall protection. In general, Wontroba brought the audience up to 1909-1999 date on the computer systems currently in use at the Chicago forecast office and fielded questions as he progressed in his informative and well-received talk. 1951-2000 Attendance was again excellent with approximately 40 members and guests. Next month's meeting will be at the Center Weather Service Unit (CWSU) at the FAA Air Traffic Control Center in Aurora. That program 1916-1999 will be presented by Patricia Wontroba, meteorologist- in-charge of the CWSU.—Paul Dailey. • Vol. 8 J, No. 5, May 2000

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: May 1, 2000

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