In Memoriam

In Memoriam Equall y at hom e wrestling snowcats across the ice, operationa l manager of the Automated Weather Net- makin g airborne magnetometer surveys of the African wor k (ATN), a pioneering worldwide computer net- continent, and shaping science policy in the corridors wor k that gathered weather data over the entire earth of Congress and in the Old Executive Office Build- an d moved it to a central point for analysis and fore- ing, Ostenso was also a shrewd student of the finan- casting. This system revolutionized weather data col- cial markets, an avid and knowledgable collector of lectio n and distribution. The AW N immediately be- art, and a devotee of symphonic music. Ned could dis- cam e a national resource, simultaneously providing cuss Mahle r and Bruckner with the same verve and this same database to the USAF , U.S. Navy, and the insigh t that he brought to Mahlma n and Broecker. U.S . Weather Bureau at unprecedented speeds. Rai n or shine, Ned Ostenso looked forward to ev- Fro m 1970 to 1971 he was the assistant director ery day and pronounced it "fa-a-antastic." H e repeat- of operations at the Air Force Global Weather Central, edl y scorned the use of "sesquipedalian language" but coordinatin g the weather support requirements of all develope d over the years his own unique lexicon, agencie s of the Department of Defens e plus the na- richly strewn with what his coworkers referred to as tiona l intelligence community. His next assignment at "nedisms, " and avidly noted and archived. In count- Offut t Ai r Force Base was as chief of analysis and less "rich discussions," with "peccable witnesses" he forecastin g at Global fro m 1971 to 1973, responsible woul d "opine" on the "Kabuki dance," "milling fo r all day-to-day weather forecasting for the air force aroun d smartly," "mutually orthogonal interests," and an d army. H e oversaw 270 people in seven work cen- preoccupatio n with "organization hygiene" that char- ters with a staff of 60 on duty 24 hours per day, seven acteriz e so muc h of government life. day s a week. This included forecasts for NASA' s space Ostens o is survived by his wife, Grace L. Ostenso program , computer flight plans for Air Force One, joint of Washington, D.C.; a sister, Mary Ellen, and her NAT O operations, targeting forecasts for the USAF's husban d Ralph Jondle of Wales, Wisconsin; a cousin, ICBMs , and the war in Vietnam. From 1973 until his Joh n Ostenso, and his wife Beverly of Washington, retiremen t in 1974, he was chief of Aerospace Sci- D.C. ; and a large complement of nieces and nephews. ences , Headquarters Strategic Air Command. Whil e it is easy to mis s Ostenso and lament his loss, A s a civilian, Sharp joine d Northern Natural Gas thos e of us wh o were privileged to kno w him equally Compan y in Omaha, Nebraska, as its corporate me- fee l his exhortation to "get over it," and get on with teorologist . In 1985 h e retire d fro m tha t compan y and th e rich celebration of life and continual acts of ser- founde d Vortex, Inc., Weathe r Consultants. He sold vice to our profession and to our colleagues. Ned, we Vorte x to th e Omah a NB C affiliate i n 1987 and served ar e moving forward.—William Hooke. a s its senior meteorologist until retiring and returning t o his roots in Pennsylvania, where he and his wife, Almira , could be closer to both of their families. John D. Sharp Jack' s list of interests and achievements is as di- 1929-199 7 vers e as it is long. It was at FS U in 1952 that he be- cam e National NCA A Champion on the swinging Joh n "Jack" D. Sharp, Col. (Ret.) U.S. Air Force (USAF) , bor n in Philadelphi a o n 19 Augus t 1929, died at hi s residenc e in Holland , Pennsylvania , on 27 Ma y 3 n ji/Lemjcmam Shar p graduate d fro m Th e Florid a State University (FSU ) wit h a B.S . in mathematic s in 1953. H e imme- diatel y went on to receive a B.S. in meteorology in 1954 fro m Th e Pennsylvani a State University . In 1962, whil e serving as an USA F weathe r officer , h e earned hi s M.S . degree in meteorolog y fro m FSU . WiMkmi & JLMm Hi s 21-year career in the Ai r Weathe r Service be- 1915-1997 ga n in 1953. Until 1965 he served as a forecaster, aerial weathe r observer, climatologist, and computer systems analys t in places as diverse as Alaska and Morocco. Fro m 1965 to 1970 h e was the principle architect and Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 179 9 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

Equall y at hom e wrestling snowcats across the ice, operationa l manager of the Automated Weather Net- makin g airborne magnetometer surveys of the African wor k (ATN), a pioneering worldwide computer net- continent, and shaping science policy in the corridors wor k that gathered weather data over the entire earth of Congress and in the Old Executive Office Build- an d moved it to a central point for analysis and fore- ing, Ostenso was also a shrewd student of the finan- casting. This system revolutionized weather data col- cial markets, an avid and knowledgable collector of lectio n and distribution. The AW N immediately be- art, and a devotee of symphonic music. Ned could dis- cam e a national resource, simultaneously providing cuss Mahle r and Bruckner with the same verve and this same database to the USAF , U.S. Navy, and the insigh t that he brought to Mahlma n and Broecker. U.S . Weather Bureau at unprecedented speeds. Rai n or shine, Ned Ostenso looked forward to ev- Fro m 1970 to 1971 he was the assistant director ery day and pronounced it "fa-a-antastic." H e repeat- of operations at the Air Force Global Weather Central, edl y scorned the use of "sesquipedalian language" but coordinatin g the weather support requirements of all develope d over the years his own unique lexicon, agencie s of the Department of Defens e plus the na- richly strewn with what his coworkers referred to as tiona l intelligence community. His next assignment at "nedisms, " and avidly noted and archived. In count- Offut t Ai r Force Base was as chief of analysis and less "rich discussions," with "peccable witnesses" he forecastin g at Global fro m 1971 to 1973, responsible woul d "opine" on the "Kabuki dance," "milling fo r all day-to-day weather forecasting for the air force aroun d smartly," "mutually orthogonal interests," and an d army. H e oversaw 270 people in seven work cen- preoccupatio n with "organization hygiene" that char- ters with a staff of 60 on duty 24 hours per day, seven acteriz e so muc h of government life. day s a week. This included forecasts for NASA' s space Ostens o is survived by his wife, Grace L. Ostenso program , computer flight plans for Air Force One, joint of Washington, D.C.; a sister, Mary Ellen, and her NAT O operations, targeting forecasts for the USAF's husban d Ralph Jondle of Wales, Wisconsin; a cousin, ICBMs , and the war in Vietnam. From 1973 until his Joh n Ostenso, and his wife Beverly of Washington, retiremen t in 1974, he was chief of Aerospace Sci- D.C. ; and a large complement of nieces and nephews. ences , Headquarters Strategic Air Command. Whil e it is easy to mis s Ostenso and lament his loss, A s a civilian, Sharp joine d Northern Natural Gas thos e of us wh o were privileged to kno w him equally Compan y in Omaha, Nebraska, as its corporate me- fee l his exhortation to "get over it," and get on with teorologist . In 1985 h e retire d fro m tha t compan y and th e rich celebration of life and continual acts of ser- founde d Vortex, Inc., Weathe r Consultants. He sold vice to our profession and to our colleagues. Ned, we Vorte x to th e Omah a NB C affiliate i n 1987 and served ar e moving forward.—William Hooke. a s its senior meteorologist until retiring and returning t o his roots in Pennsylvania, where he and his wife, Almira , could be closer to both of their families. John D. Sharp Jack' s list of interests and achievements is as di- 1929-199 7 vers e as it is long. It was at FS U in 1952 that he be- cam e National NCA A Champion on the swinging Joh n "Jack" D. Sharp, Col. (Ret.) U.S. Air Force (USAF) , bor n in Philadelphi a o n 19 Augus t 1929, died at hi s residenc e in Holland , Pennsylvania , on 27 Ma y 3 n ji/Lemjcmam Shar p graduate d fro m Th e Florid a State University (FSU ) wit h a B.S . in mathematic s in 1953. H e imme- diatel y went on to receive a B.S. in meteorology in 1954 fro m Th e Pennsylvani a State University . In 1962, whil e serving as an USA F weathe r officer , h e earned hi s M.S . degree in meteorolog y fro m FSU . WiMkmi & JLMm Hi s 21-year career in the Ai r Weathe r Service be- 1915-1997 ga n in 1953. Until 1965 he served as a forecaster, aerial weathe r observer, climatologist, and computer systems analys t in places as diverse as Alaska and Morocco. Fro m 1965 to 1970 h e was the principle architect and Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 179 9

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Published: Aug 1, 1997

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