In Memoriam

In Memoriam a public and aviation forecaster at Montreal, Gander, as an advisor in National Center for Atmospheric and Winnipeg. During this period, he obtained a gradu- Research programs. ate degree from McGill University and began to re- In his native Canada, he was active in the affairs of search and publish pa- the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic pers on forecasting and Society, for which he served as president from 1972 to severe storms. 1973. Earlier in his career, he wa s awarded the Darton In 1959 McKay was Prize, the President's Prize for his research publica- seconded to the Prai- tions, and the prize for applied meteorology. In 1987 rie Farm Rehabilitation he was awarded the Patterson Medal, Canada's pre- Administration offices mier award for distinguished service to meteorology. in Regina as a hydro- Gordon retired in 1984 after acting as director meteorologist, where general of the Canadian Climate Centre for a year. In he provided advice to his retirement, McKay continued to be a frequent engineers and admin- visitor to AES headquarters as he undertook various istrators and continued consulting and research projects. For several months his research. Then, in in 1988 he served as conference secretary for the 1966, he wa s posted to successful World Conference on the Changing Atmo- the Toronto meteoro- sphere, which Canada hosted in Toronto. logical headquarters as Gordon was unfailingly cheerful and optimistic. He superintendent of cli- exhibited an intense interest in meteorology, climatol- matological research. ogy, science in general, and just about everything ^rndfm ji/icJta^ In this position, and else. Always willing to provide information and advice shortly later as director to his colleagues, he will be greatly missed. of the Meteorological/Climatological Applications Gordon is survive d by his wife, Sandy, three daugh- branch, he served on many national committees for ters, a son, and six grandchildren.—Morley Thomas. the International Biological Program, agricultural me- teorology, quaternary research, snow engineering, and climate change. Later in this period he became very interested in the socioeconomic aspects of cli- K 4 mate change, a subject on which he frequently pub- lished and spoke. McKay's professional activities were not limited to y \ Canada. Fluently bilingual, he was a member of the Canadian delegations at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Climatology in 1973, 1978, and 1982. For WMO he served as the chairman of working groups on climate change for a decade and was a frequent participant in meetings 3n jU^mcuam and planning groups at Geneva during those years. On several occasions he represented WMO at meet- ings of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment, the International Federation of Institutes for Advanced Study, the United Nations Educational, . i/lowlecAai^i/lea d Scientific and Cultural Organization, and other inter- national organizations, and he traveled to Algeria as a 1906-1995 WMO expert. He also had a unique standing in climate circles of the United States, where he was frequently in demand (s>. i flumd to contribute to committees and working groups of AMS, AAAS, the National Science Foundation, and 1915-1995 other government agencies and universities. He was a member of the AMS Committee on Applied Meteo- rology for six years and was an elected Fellow of the Society. Until the time of his death, McKay participated 1652 Vol. 76, No. 9, September 1995 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

a public and aviation forecaster at Montreal, Gander, as an advisor in National Center for Atmospheric and Winnipeg. During this period, he obtained a gradu- Research programs. ate degree from McGill University and began to re- In his native Canada, he was active in the affairs of search and publish pa- the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic pers on forecasting and Society, for which he served as president from 1972 to severe storms. 1973. Earlier in his career, he wa s awarded the Darton In 1959 McKay was Prize, the President's Prize for his research publica- seconded to the Prai- tions, and the prize for applied meteorology. In 1987 rie Farm Rehabilitation he was awarded the Patterson Medal, Canada's pre- Administration offices mier award for distinguished service to meteorology. in Regina as a hydro- Gordon retired in 1984 after acting as director meteorologist, where general of the Canadian Climate Centre for a year. In he provided advice to his retirement, McKay continued to be a frequent engineers and admin- visitor to AES headquarters as he undertook various istrators and continued consulting and research projects. For several months his research. Then, in in 1988 he served as conference secretary for the 1966, he wa s posted to successful World Conference on the Changing Atmo- the Toronto meteoro- sphere, which Canada hosted in Toronto. logical headquarters as Gordon was unfailingly cheerful and optimistic. He superintendent of cli- exhibited an intense interest in meteorology, climatol- matological research. ogy, science in general, and just about everything ^rndfm ji/icJta^ In this position, and else. Always willing to provide information and advice shortly later as director to his colleagues, he will be greatly missed. of the Meteorological/Climatological Applications Gordon is survive d by his wife, Sandy, three daugh- branch, he served on many national committees for ters, a son, and six grandchildren.—Morley Thomas. the International Biological Program, agricultural me- teorology, quaternary research, snow engineering, and climate change. Later in this period he became very interested in the socioeconomic aspects of cli- K 4 mate change, a subject on which he frequently pub- lished and spoke. McKay's professional activities were not limited to y \ Canada. Fluently bilingual, he was a member of the Canadian delegations at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Climatology in 1973, 1978, and 1982. For WMO he served as the chairman of working groups on climate change for a decade and was a frequent participant in meetings 3n jU^mcuam and planning groups at Geneva during those years. On several occasions he represented WMO at meet- ings of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment, the International Federation of Institutes for Advanced Study, the United Nations Educational, . i/lowlecAai^i/lea d Scientific and Cultural Organization, and other inter- national organizations, and he traveled to Algeria as a 1906-1995 WMO expert. He also had a unique standing in climate circles of the United States, where he was frequently in demand (s>. i flumd to contribute to committees and working groups of AMS, AAAS, the National Science Foundation, and 1915-1995 other government agencies and universities. He was a member of the AMS Committee on Applied Meteo- rology for six years and was an elected Fellow of the Society. Until the time of his death, McKay participated 1652 Vol. 76, No. 9, September 1995

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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