In Memoriam

In Memoriam studied the "generous circulation" or "polarization per- careful observations—never mind the pencil pushing versity" radar, Speed's imagination had something to exercises. The argument about a "proper" rainfall offer.—James Metcalf. measurement came to a head in a North Carolina restaurant during GALE. At Speed's insistence, we Speed was an excellent husband and family man. bothered the restaurant owner for every empty soup That tells a lot about him as a person, aside from his can in his possession and later that afternoon covered ability as a research scientist in radar meteorology. the roof of the Marine Science Laboratory with the Speed was always courteous, frank, and helpful to cans to map the distribution of rainfall. My recollection everyone, especially to me, and I will always cherish is that Speed's point was correct: the building's roof the kind counsel and inspiration he gave me.—Steven did modify the airflow and cause a systematic bias in Ricci. the measurement of rainfall. Speed's enthusiasm and strongly positive attitude any testaments to Speed's scientific ac- were among his greatest virtues in my view. This J/ i complishments are found in the meteoro- optimistic, even temperament made working with him f ' ! logical journals and are carried personally a real pleasure.—Earle Williams. by many of you. This note will exemplify a couple of his traits that are known to his close associ- I worked at the MIT weather radar section in the top ates during his 40 years at MIT: the first is his active floor of the old building with Speed from 1955 to 1958. interest in all aspects of science, and the second, the It was a very short stay but it was one of the most expression of his warm personality in his own brand of fruitful periods in my weather radar research history. humor. —Nobuhiko Kodaira. Speed greatly enjoyed his family, his many friends, I first got to know Spiros on a special military project science, tennis, conversation on any topic, and simple in the Tropical Test Zone of Panama in 1968. We dining. He took the lead in organizing many dinners worked together on a critical project to correct a attended by his associates from the Weather Radar munitions problem occurring during heavy rain events Laboratory, the faculty, students, and visitors from in Vietnam. I learned quickly that Spiros Geotis was a around the world. Speed, often serving as moderator person of many technical, personal, and leadership in the heated discussions, attached nicknames to abilities. Since that first, close experience with Spiros, many of his associates: for example, Copelink, I had the pleasure of working with him on numerous Frederico der Grosser, Renewell, Triple "R," and That national, international, and professional activities. Which Gathers No Moss. These names were Speed's Foremost among the latter was our association on the warm and friendly greeting to us for almost 40 years.— AMS Committee on Radar Meteorology. Spiros Geotis Melvin Stone. and I shared things together at home and in far away places that I will always cherish. He was an inspiration Speed Geotis, as the radar engineer in MIT's to me and I will miss him greatly.—MichaelD. Hudlow.m Weather Radar Laboratory for four decades, mea- sured rainfall (with and without radar) all over the world—in Panama, over the Atlantic Ocean in GATE, in Borneo in Winter MONEX, in North Carolina in GALE, in Australia in both EMEX and DUNDEE, and in projects with Lincoln Laboratory in Massachusetts, Alabama, and Florida. Speed was also a great lover of 3n jl/LemxmcMri thunderstorms, and through numerous discussions on this topic we first became acquainted nearly 20 years ago when I was still a graduate student. The acquaintance grew far beyond the discussions, and ^ohn SB. 3€owei7nale Speed and I teamed up on several of these field 1938-1994 programs to study thunderstorms. We had our share of healthy arguments during these experiments—the optimal method to calibrate ,4lf Jtytey the radar, the relative merits of RHI and PPI scanning 1911-1993 strategies, the relative numbers of intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning flashes, and the effects of a structure on the local measurement of rainfall. Speed always believed strongly in settling the issue through Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

studied the "generous circulation" or "polarization per- careful observations—never mind the pencil pushing versity" radar, Speed's imagination had something to exercises. The argument about a "proper" rainfall offer.—James Metcalf. measurement came to a head in a North Carolina restaurant during GALE. At Speed's insistence, we Speed was an excellent husband and family man. bothered the restaurant owner for every empty soup That tells a lot about him as a person, aside from his can in his possession and later that afternoon covered ability as a research scientist in radar meteorology. the roof of the Marine Science Laboratory with the Speed was always courteous, frank, and helpful to cans to map the distribution of rainfall. My recollection everyone, especially to me, and I will always cherish is that Speed's point was correct: the building's roof the kind counsel and inspiration he gave me.—Steven did modify the airflow and cause a systematic bias in Ricci. the measurement of rainfall. Speed's enthusiasm and strongly positive attitude any testaments to Speed's scientific ac- were among his greatest virtues in my view. This J/ i complishments are found in the meteoro- optimistic, even temperament made working with him f ' ! logical journals and are carried personally a real pleasure.—Earle Williams. by many of you. This note will exemplify a couple of his traits that are known to his close associ- I worked at the MIT weather radar section in the top ates during his 40 years at MIT: the first is his active floor of the old building with Speed from 1955 to 1958. interest in all aspects of science, and the second, the It was a very short stay but it was one of the most expression of his warm personality in his own brand of fruitful periods in my weather radar research history. humor. —Nobuhiko Kodaira. Speed greatly enjoyed his family, his many friends, I first got to know Spiros on a special military project science, tennis, conversation on any topic, and simple in the Tropical Test Zone of Panama in 1968. We dining. He took the lead in organizing many dinners worked together on a critical project to correct a attended by his associates from the Weather Radar munitions problem occurring during heavy rain events Laboratory, the faculty, students, and visitors from in Vietnam. I learned quickly that Spiros Geotis was a around the world. Speed, often serving as moderator person of many technical, personal, and leadership in the heated discussions, attached nicknames to abilities. Since that first, close experience with Spiros, many of his associates: for example, Copelink, I had the pleasure of working with him on numerous Frederico der Grosser, Renewell, Triple "R," and That national, international, and professional activities. Which Gathers No Moss. These names were Speed's Foremost among the latter was our association on the warm and friendly greeting to us for almost 40 years.— AMS Committee on Radar Meteorology. Spiros Geotis Melvin Stone. and I shared things together at home and in far away places that I will always cherish. He was an inspiration Speed Geotis, as the radar engineer in MIT's to me and I will miss him greatly.—MichaelD. Hudlow.m Weather Radar Laboratory for four decades, mea- sured rainfall (with and without radar) all over the world—in Panama, over the Atlantic Ocean in GATE, in Borneo in Winter MONEX, in North Carolina in GALE, in Australia in both EMEX and DUNDEE, and in projects with Lincoln Laboratory in Massachusetts, Alabama, and Florida. Speed was also a great lover of 3n jl/LemxmcMri thunderstorms, and through numerous discussions on this topic we first became acquainted nearly 20 years ago when I was still a graduate student. The acquaintance grew far beyond the discussions, and ^ohn SB. 3€owei7nale Speed and I teamed up on several of these field 1938-1994 programs to study thunderstorms. We had our share of healthy arguments during these experiments—the optimal method to calibrate ,4lf Jtytey the radar, the relative merits of RHI and PPI scanning 1911-1993 strategies, the relative numbers of intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning flashes, and the effects of a structure on the local measurement of rainfall. Speed always believed strongly in settling the issue through Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Aug 1, 1994

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