In Memoriam

In Memoriam tion at Khabarovsk in Siberia. The weather central at every workshop, institute, or short course on teach- Khabarovsk, and a second one at Petropavlovsk, col- ing available to him. He was an expert in the so-called lected weather observations and provided these along Keller, or self-paced, method of instruction. His with forecasts to forces attacking Japan. The invasion course in thermodynamics was taught by this system of Japan, planned for November 1945, became unnec- for many years. He also taught a flight recertification essary with the surrender following the atomic bomb course for the Texas Engineering Extension Service. strikes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The navy weather In 1985 he received a Distinguished Teaching Award centrals in Siberia were closed in December 1945. fro m the Texas A&M University Association of Former Students. After the war, Cumberledge had yet another ren- dezvous with history, serving as senior meteorologi- Runnels's research interests included radar-pre- cal officer for the first peacetime atomic bomb test at cipitation relationships, meteorological aspects of air Bikini atoll aboard the flagship USS Mt. McKinley. pollution, and the consequences of anthropogenic heat in urban areas. His hometown, Houston, was often the In later tours, he served in weather assignments in focus for such studies. He became a member of the San Diego, California; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Guam; AMS in 1968. and Yokosuka, Japan. He also headed the Meteorol- ogy Department at the Naval Postgraduate School. His As his next-door office neighbor for more than 16 final tour was as staff meteorologist for the com- years, I valued Bob for his marvelous insights into the mander in chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe. Follow- teaching/learning process, his inquisitive mind, and ing his retirement from that assignment in 1960, he the many hours he spent one-on-one with meteorol- and his wife, Mary Louise Clark, toured Europe by ogy students. Colleagues and students alike will miss car. him.—Dennis M. Driscoll. A native of Newcastle, Pennsylvania, Cumberledge joined the navy when he was 17 and after a year was assigned to the U.S. Naval Academy, graduating with honors in 1931. He studied meteorology at the Naval Academy's graduate school and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned a master's degree in 1940. f x In addition to his wife, he is survived by a daugh- ter, two sons, 10 grandchildren, and 4 great-grandchil- dren. Cumberledge's remains were scattered at sea. —T. V. Fredian. Rober t C. Runnels 1935-199 5 j(/temcMMr i Robert C. Runnels, associate professor of meteo- rology, died on 11 November 1995. He was an active member of the meteorology faculty at Texas A&M University, where he had served since 1968. He earned a B.S. in physics from the University of Hous- 1959-1995 ton and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from Texas A&M, the latter in 1968. From 1965 to 1966 he was employed as a research scientist at NASA Johnson Space Cen- ^ec^e CW. jl/ioimiA ter. 1922-1995 Runnels devoted most of his attention and energy to teaching and over the years taught all but a few of the undergraduate courses offered at A&M, most fre- quently thermodynamics, radar meteorology, and physical meteorology. He participated in virtually 57 9 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society
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Abstract

tion at Khabarovsk in Siberia. The weather central at every workshop, institute, or short course on teach- Khabarovsk, and a second one at Petropavlovsk, col- ing available to him. He was an expert in the so-called lected weather observations and provided these along Keller, or self-paced, method of instruction. His with forecasts to forces attacking Japan. The invasion course in thermodynamics was taught by this system of Japan, planned for November 1945, became unnec- for many years. He also taught a flight recertification essary with the surrender following the atomic bomb course for the Texas Engineering Extension Service. strikes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The navy weather In 1985 he received a Distinguished Teaching Award centrals in Siberia were closed in December 1945. fro m the Texas A&M University Association of Former Students. After the war, Cumberledge had yet another ren- dezvous with history, serving as senior meteorologi- Runnels's research interests included radar-pre- cal officer for the first peacetime atomic bomb test at cipitation relationships, meteorological aspects of air Bikini atoll aboard the flagship USS Mt. McKinley. pollution, and the consequences of anthropogenic heat in urban areas. His hometown, Houston, was often the In later tours, he served in weather assignments in focus for such studies. He became a member of the San Diego, California; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Guam; AMS in 1968. and Yokosuka, Japan. He also headed the Meteorol- ogy Department at the Naval Postgraduate School. His As his next-door office neighbor for more than 16 final tour was as staff meteorologist for the com- years, I valued Bob for his marvelous insights into the mander in chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe. Follow- teaching/learning process, his inquisitive mind, and ing his retirement from that assignment in 1960, he the many hours he spent one-on-one with meteorol- and his wife, Mary Louise Clark, toured Europe by ogy students. Colleagues and students alike will miss car. him.—Dennis M. Driscoll. A native of Newcastle, Pennsylvania, Cumberledge joined the navy when he was 17 and after a year was assigned to the U.S. Naval Academy, graduating with honors in 1931. He studied meteorology at the Naval Academy's graduate school and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned a master's degree in 1940. f x In addition to his wife, he is survived by a daugh- ter, two sons, 10 grandchildren, and 4 great-grandchil- dren. Cumberledge's remains were scattered at sea. —T. V. Fredian. Rober t C. Runnels 1935-199 5 j(/temcMMr i Robert C. Runnels, associate professor of meteo- rology, died on 11 November 1995. He was an active member of the meteorology faculty at Texas A&M University, where he had served since 1968. He earned a B.S. in physics from the University of Hous- 1959-1995 ton and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from Texas A&M, the latter in 1968. From 1965 to 1966 he was employed as a research scientist at NASA Johnson Space Cen- ^ec^e CW. jl/ioimiA ter. 1922-1995 Runnels devoted most of his attention and energy to teaching and over the years taught all but a few of the undergraduate courses offered at A&M, most fre- quently thermodynamics, radar meteorology, and physical meteorology. He participated in virtually 57 9 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

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Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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