IN BOX

IN BOX INSIGHTS and INNOVATIONS Dropwindsonde Observations for Typhoon Surveillance near the Taiwan Region (DOTSTAR) An Overview BY CHUN-CHIEH WU , PO-HSIUNG LIN, SIM ABERSON, TIEN-CHIANG YEH, WEI-PENG HUANG, KUN-HSUA N CHOU, JING-SHAN HONG, GUO-CHEN LU, CHIN-TZU FONG, KUAN-CHIEN HSU, L-L LIN, PAY-LIAM LIN, AND CHING-HWANG LIU yphoons are the most catastrophic weather phe- nomeno n in Taiwan. In 2001 alone, typhoons in TTaiwan caused 583 deaths and tremendous dam- age, including more than US$400 million in agricul- tural losses, and nearly paralyzed the Taipei Rapid Transit System. Ironically, typhoon rainfall is also a crucial water resource in Taiwan. An unfortunate lack of observations—other than those fro m satellites—in and around tropical cyclones in the region limits the accuracy of forecasts. As pointed out in the January 1999 Bulletin in an article by W u and Kuo, current data are inadequate for accurate initial and boundary FIG. I. Th e Astr a SP X jet releasing a dropwindsonde condition s for numerical tropical cyclone forecast (circled ) during a tes t flight in Marc h 2003. models. This deficiency constrains tropical cyclone forecast accuracy, as well as general understanding of tropical cyclones in the Northwest Pacific region. with collaboration between researchers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/BAMS-86-6-787
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INSIGHTS and INNOVATIONS Dropwindsonde Observations for Typhoon Surveillance near the Taiwan Region (DOTSTAR) An Overview BY CHUN-CHIEH WU , PO-HSIUNG LIN, SIM ABERSON, TIEN-CHIANG YEH, WEI-PENG HUANG, KUN-HSUA N CHOU, JING-SHAN HONG, GUO-CHEN LU, CHIN-TZU FONG, KUAN-CHIEN HSU, L-L LIN, PAY-LIAM LIN, AND CHING-HWANG LIU yphoons are the most catastrophic weather phe- nomeno n in Taiwan. In 2001 alone, typhoons in TTaiwan caused 583 deaths and tremendous dam- age, including more than US$400 million in agricul- tural losses, and nearly paralyzed the Taipei Rapid Transit System. Ironically, typhoon rainfall is also a crucial water resource in Taiwan. An unfortunate lack of observations—other than those fro m satellites—in and around tropical cyclones in the region limits the accuracy of forecasts. As pointed out in the January 1999 Bulletin in an article by W u and Kuo, current data are inadequate for accurate initial and boundary FIG. I. Th e Astr a SP X jet releasing a dropwindsonde condition s for numerical tropical cyclone forecast (circled ) during a tes t flight in Marc h 2003. models. This deficiency constrains tropical cyclone forecast accuracy, as well as general understanding of tropical cyclones in the Northwest Pacific region. with collaboration between researchers

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Jun 1, 2005

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